Which would you choose — a daily tablet or a trip to the doctor for an allergy shot? Eddie Lawrence/Dorling Kindersley/Getty Images hide caption

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Lorenzo Gritti for NPR
Aspirin Both Triggers And Treats An Often-Missed Disease
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When a baby is born by cesarean section, she misses out on Mom's microbes in the birth canal. Sarah Small/Getty Images hide caption

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Researchers Test Microbe Wipe To Promote Babies' Health After C-Sections
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Neanderthals, represented here by a museum's reconstruction, had been living in Eurasia for 200,000 years when Homo sapiens first passed through, and the communities intermingled. The same genes that today play a role in allergies very likely fostered a quick response to local bacteria, viruses and other pathogens, scientists say. Pierre Andrieu/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Itchy Eyes? Sneezing? Maybe Blame That Allergy On Neanderthals
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Vidhya Nagarajan for NPR
Kids, Allergies And A Possible Downside To Squeaky Clean Dishes
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Sucking may be one of the most beneficial ways to clean a baby's dirty pacifier, a study found iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Parents' Saliva On Pacifiers Could Ward Off Baby's Allergies
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Otolaryngologist Sandra Lin uses under-the-tongue drops to treat patients with allergies at Johns Hopkins in Baltimore. Courtesy of Keith Weller/Johns Hopkins Medicine hide caption

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