People with severe allergies often carry an epinephrine pen to stop life-threatening reactions. But emergency room doctors may not know that's the best treatment. Paul Rapson/Science Source hide caption

itoggle caption Paul Rapson/Science Source

Sucking may be one of the most beneficial ways to clean a baby's dirty pacifier, a study found iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Otolaryngologist Sandra Lin uses under-the-tongue drops to treat patients with allergies at Johns Hopkins in Baltimore. Courtesy of Keith Weller/Johns Hopkins Medicine hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Keith Weller/Johns Hopkins Medicine

The sting of Solenopsis invicta, the red imported fire ant, is well known to many in the Southern United States, but immunotherapy is possible. Courtesy of Alex Wild hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Alex Wild

Contact with animals and dirty environments may be one reason farm kids are less likely to get allergies, researchers say. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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