Monkeys' vocal equipment can produce the sounds of human speech, research shows, but they lack the connections between the auditory and motor parts of the brain that humans rely on to imitate words. Brian Jefferey Beggerly/Flickr hide caption

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Brian Jefferey Beggerly/Flickr

Say, What? Monkey Mouths And Throats Are Equipped For Speech

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Comparative psychologist Claudia Fugazza and her dog demonstrate the "Do As I Do" method of exploring canine memory. Mirko Lui/Cell Press hide caption

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Mirko Lui/Cell Press

Your Dog Remembers Every Move You Make

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Heavy Screen Time Rewires Young Brains, For Better And Worse

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When in a playful mood, rats like a gentle tickle as much as the next guy, researchers find. Shimpei Ishiyama and Michael Brecht/Science hide caption

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Shimpei Ishiyama and Michael Brecht/Science

Sure, keeping a teenager's thoughts corralled may seem like lion taming. But that impulsivity may help them learn, too. Luciano Lozano/Getty Images hide caption

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A molecular biologist is studying how excess sugar might alter brain chemistry, leading to overeating and eventually, obesity. Veronica Grech/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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This Scientist Is Trying To Unravel What Sugar Does To The Brain

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A relaxed, undrugged dog patiently waits its turn in the MRI scanner. The scientists' trick: Make it seem fun. Enikő Kubinyi/Science hide caption

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Enikő Kubinyi/Science

How A Dog In An MRI Scanner Is Like Your Grandma At A Disco

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Twin girls born with extremely small heads, shrunken spinal cords and extra folds of skin around the skull. Scientists think this skin forms when the skull collapses onto itself after the brain —€” but not the skull —€” stops growing. The images of the girls' heads were constructed on the computer using CT scans taken shortly after birth. The girls were infected with Zika at 9 weeks gestation. Courtesy of the Radiological Society of North America hide caption

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Courtesy of the Radiological Society of North America

Parkinson's disease, smoking, certain head injuries and even normal aging can influence our sense of smell. But certain patterns of loss in the ability to identify odors seem pronounced in Alzheimer's, researchers say. CSA Images/Color Printstock Collection/Getty Images hide caption

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CSA Images/Color Printstock Collection/Getty Images

A Sniff Test For Alzheimer's Checks For The Ability To Identify Odors

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Lucky laboratory mice got to watch scenes from Orson Welles' classic Touch of Evil, starring Janet Leigh and Charlton Heston. Keystone/Getty Images hide caption

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A Mouse Watches Film Noir And Offers Clues To Human Consciousness

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Jess Thom (left) and Jess Mabel Jones from Thom's show, Backstage in Biscuit Land. Thom's website says she's "changing the world, one tic at a time." James Lyndsay/Courtesy of Supporting Wall hide caption

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James Lyndsay/Courtesy of Supporting Wall
Katherine Streeter for NPR

What's Good For The Heart Is Good For The Brain

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Half Your Brain Stands Guard When Sleeping In A New Place

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