If you've noticed that kids seem to be better at figuring out these things, you're not alone. iStockphoto hide caption

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Preschoolers Outsmart College Students In Figuring Out Gadgets

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Katherine Streeter for NPR

Bursts Of Light Create Memories, Then Take Them Away

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Daniel Horowitz for NPR

Hacking The Brain With Electricity: Don't Try This At Home

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Klotho (right) is one of the three Greek Fates depicted in this Flemish tapestry at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London. Wikimedia Commons hide caption

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Wikimedia Commons

Anti-Aging Hormone Could Make You Smarter

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People smoke marijuana, presumably, because it affects their brains, not despite that fact. Above, people in Sao Paulo, Brazil, campaign for the legalization of marijuana. Nelson Almeida/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Images of the developing fetal brain show connections among brain regions. Allen Institute for Brain Science; Bruce Fischl, Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital hide caption

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Allen Institute for Brain Science; Bruce Fischl, Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital

Map Of The Developing Human Brain Shows Where Problems Begin

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Researchers say intervention in early childhood may help the developing brain compensate by rewiring to work around the trouble spots. iStockphoto hide caption

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Brain Changes Suggest Autism Starts In The Womb

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