A relaxed, undrugged dog patiently waits its turn in the MRI scanner. The scientists' trick: Make it seem fun. Enikő Kubinyi/Science hide caption

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Enikő Kubinyi/Science

How A Dog In An MRI Scanner Is Like Your Grandma At A Disco

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Twin girls born with extremely small heads, shrunken spinal cords and extra folds of skin around the skull. Scientists think this skin forms when the skull collapses onto itself after the brain —€” but not the skull —€” stops growing. The images of the girls' heads were constructed on the computer using CT scans taken shortly after birth. The girls were infected with Zika at 9 weeks gestation. Courtesy of the Radiological Society of North America hide caption

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Courtesy of the Radiological Society of North America

Parkinson's disease, smoking, certain head injuries and even normal aging can influence our sense of smell. But certain patterns of loss in the ability to identify odors seem pronounced in Alzheimer's, researchers say. CSA Images/Color Printstock Collection/Getty Images hide caption

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CSA Images/Color Printstock Collection/Getty Images

A Sniff Test For Alzheimer's Checks For The Ability To Identify Odors

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Lucky laboratory mice got to watch scenes from Orson Welles' classic Touch of Evil, starring Janet Leigh and Charlton Heston. Keystone/Getty Images hide caption

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Keystone/Getty Images

A Mouse Watches Film Noir And Offers Clues To Human Consciousness

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Jess Thom (left) and Jess Mabel Jones from Thom's show, Backstage in Biscuit Land. Thom's website says she's "changing the world, one tic at a time." James Lyndsay/Courtesy of Supporting Wall hide caption

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James Lyndsay/Courtesy of Supporting Wall
Katherine Streeter for NPR

What's Good For The Heart Is Good For The Brain

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Half Your Brain Stands Guard When Sleeping In A New Place

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Ian Burkhart prepares for a training session in Columbus, Ohio. To move muscles in Burkhart's hand, the system relies on electrodes implanted in his brain, a computer interface attached to his skull, and electrical stimulators wrapped around his forearm. Lee Powell/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Lee Powell/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Technology Helps A Paralyzed Man Transform Thought Into Movement

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I know the way to Khan's place. The Kobal Collection hide caption

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The Kobal Collection

Beam Me Up, Scotty? Turns Out Your Brain Is Ready For Teleportation

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