Acting as a "sender," brain researcher Rajesh Rao watches a video game and waits for the time to hit the "fire" button. But he'll only think about doing that — the impulse was carried out by someone in another building, in a recent test of brain-to-brain communication. University of Washington hide caption

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University of Washington

Could the images common in accounts of near-death experiences be explained by a rush of electrical activity in the brain? Odina/iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Odina/iStockphoto.com

Brains Of Dying Rats Yield Clues About Near-Death Experiences

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Instructional assistant Jessica Reeder touches her nose to get Jacob Day, 3, who has autism, to focus his attention on her during a therapy session in April 2007. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Rich Pedroncelli/AP

The Human Voice May Not Spark Pleasure In Children With Autism

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Although a flying pig doesn't exist in the real world, our brains use what we know about pigs and birds — and superheroes — to create one in our mind's eye when we hear or read those words. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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iStockphoto.com

Imagine A Flying Pig: How Words Take Shape In The Brain

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A window into dreams may now be opening. Silver Screen Collection/Getty Images hide caption

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Silver Screen Collection/Getty Images

Researchers Use Brain Scans To Reveal Hidden Dreamscape

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This image shows a human glial cell (green) among normal mouse glial cells (red). The human cell is larger, sends out more fibers and has more connections than do mouse cells. Mice with this type of human cell implanted in their brains perform better on learning and memory tests than do typical mice. Courtesy of Steven Goldman hide caption

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Courtesy of Steven Goldman

To Make Mice Smarter, Add A Few Human Brain Cells

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Movies like The Shining frighten most of us, but some brain-damaged people feel no fear when they watch a scary film. However, an unseen threat — air with a high level of carbon dioxide — produces a surprising result. Warner Bros./Photofest hide caption

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Warner Bros./Photofest

Jonathan Mitchell is autistic and wants to donate his brain to science when he dies. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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David Gilkey/NPR

Shortage Of Brain Tissue Hinders Autism Research

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Chances are they already speak more languages than you: children from Papua New Guinea's Andai tribe of hunter-gatherers wait for their parents to vote in the village of Kaiam. Over 800 languages are spoken in PNG, a country of about six million people. Torsten Blackwood/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Torsten Blackwood/AFP/Getty Images

A visitor to the Wellcome Collection's 2012 exhibition "Brains: The mind as matter" looks at a functional magnetic resonance image (fMRI) showing a human brain as it listens to Stravinsky's "Rite of Spring" and Kant's third Critique. Miguel Medina/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Miguel Medina/AFP/Getty Images