A patrol officer in West Valley City, Utah, starts a body camera recording by pressing a button on his chest in March 2015. The West Valley City Police Department issued 190 Axon Flex body cameras for all its sworn officers to wear. George Frey/Getty Images hide caption

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An Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) in Phoenix, Ariz., on Apr. 28, 2010. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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When Sheriffs Refuse An ICE Detainment Request, They Get Called Out

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A viral image last week claimed 14 girls of color went missing in 24 hours in D.C. — though police say that's untrue. But the facts are startling, with very real consequences. Metropolitan PD, Washington DC hide caption

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Metropolitan PD, Washington DC
Chelsea Beck/NPR

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A group of people walk on Castro Street, in the downtown portion of the Silicon Valley town of Mountain View, California, August 24, 2016. (Photo by Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images). Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images hide caption

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The New Orleans Police Department was one of the first big police departments in the U.S. to embrace the use of body cameras. Sean Gardner/Getty Images hide caption

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New Orleans' Police Use Of Body Cameras Brings Benefits And New Burdens

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John Lu (left), Reynold Liang (center) and David Wu (right) during a news conference in Queens, N.Y., after being the victims of a hate crime in 2006. New York City council member David Weprin (second left) and John C. Liu look on. Adam Rountree/AP hide caption

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LaGrange Police Chief Louis Dekmar, at the Thursday remembrance for Austin Callaway. LGTV LaGrange Television/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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LGTV LaGrange Television/Screenshot by NPR

The police force for protection of Italy's cultural heritage is headquartered in Rome's Piazza Sant'Ignazio. Sylvia Poggioli/NPR hide caption

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For Italy's Art Police, An Ongoing Fight Against Pillage Of Priceless Works

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An officer salutes and family members watch before pallbearers take the casket carrying the body of officer Jose Gilbert Vega from the hall after funeral services for two police officers on October 18, 2016 in Palm Springs, Calif. The officers were fatally shot and a third wounded by a single gunman during a neighborhood disturbance earlier in October. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

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Police watch activists gather in front of The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York on July 7, as they march up Fifth Avenue in response to two recent fatal shootings of black men by police. Later, after a peaceful march in Dallas, a sniper targeting police killed five officers and wounded several others before he was killed. Yana Paskova/Getty Images hide caption

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Yana Paskova/Getty Images

How The Perceived 'War On Cops' Plays Into Politics And Policing

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