substance abuse substance abuse

Former Cleveland Browns quarterback Johnny Manziel sits while his defense attorneys confer with the prosecution during his initial hearing in May 2016 in Dallas. Smiley N. Pool/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Smiley N. Pool/AP

A police officer holds a bag of heroin that was confiscated as evidence in Gloucester, Mass., in March. Massachusetts is one of 38 states that allow civil commitment for substance abuse. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
John Moore/Getty Images

A Twist On 'Involuntary Commitment': Some Heroin Users Request It

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/502029334/502211230" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Hearing Officer Jim Teal presides over a session of Early Intervention Family Drug Court in Sacramento, Calif., in March. The county program helps keep families together — and saves taxpayers $7 million annually, Sacramento County officials say. Robert Durell for Kaiser Health News hide caption

toggle caption
Robert Durell for Kaiser Health News

California Court Helps Kids By Healing Parents' Addictions

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/480960622/490251907" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Methadone and similar drugs are legal synthetic opioids that are used to help block the cravings and withdrawal symptoms of people trying to wean themselves off prescription painkillers or heroin. Michell Eloy/WABE hide caption

toggle caption
Michell Eloy/WABE

Despite Overdose Epidemic, Georgia Caps The Number Of Opioid Treatment Clinics

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/481523994/482123566" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Getty Images

Medicaid May Soon Pay For Some Inpatient Addiction Treatment

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/459226490/462176303" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Yolanda Roberson, who directs the Empowerment program, teaches a class at a Boys and Girls Club in the Bronx. The classes are funded by the state of New York. Robert Stolarik/Courtesy of Youth Today hide caption

toggle caption
Robert Stolarik/Courtesy of Youth Today

Sales of prescription opioid painkillers have quadrupled since 1999, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Rich Pedroncelli/AP

Maine Bill Aims To Make Abuse-Deterrent Painkillers More Affordable

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/408217474/408293177" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Vidhya Nagarajan for NPR

10 Questions Some Doctors Are Afraid To Ask

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/377569539/390484929" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Officers Ned Bandoske (left) and Ernest Stevens are part of San Antonio's mental health squad — a six-person unit that answers the frequent emergency calls where mental illness may play a role. Jenny Gold/Kaiser Health News hide caption

toggle caption
Jenny Gold/Kaiser Health News

Mental Health Cops Help Reweave Social Safety Net In San Antonio

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/338895262/341542614" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript