Across Washington State, hydroelectric dams are blocking salmon as they migrate to their spawning grounds. Enter the salmon cannon. Ingrid Taylar/Flickr hide caption

itoggle caption Ingrid Taylar/Flickr

A young Chinook salmon, called a smolt, near Vallejo, Calif., on April 24, 2014. North Coast tribes and environmentalists fear that the smolts and Chinooks may not survive this year's low river flows and warm water. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Rich Pedroncelli/AP

Paul Greenberg says the decline of local fish markets, and the resulting sequestration of seafood to a corner of our supermarkets, has contributed to "the facelessness and comodification of seafood." J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

itoggle caption J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Pacific Or Bust: Fingerling Chinook salmon are dumped into a holding pen Tuesday as they are transferred from a truck into the Sacramento River in Rio Vista, Calif. From here, they'll be towed downstream for a bit, then make their own way out to the Pacific Ocean. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

A fish that knows the way to go: the Chinook salmon, which appears to use the Earth's magnetic field to navigate ocean waters and rivers. Jeff T. Green/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Jeff T. Green/Getty Images

This dead juvenile coho salmon was found in a tributary of California's South Fork Eel River. About 20 large-scale marijuana farms are located upstream from the watershed pictured. All of them divert water from the stream. Courtesy Scott Bauer hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy Scott Bauer

Employees at Pan Fish USA, a salmon fish farm, unload fish feed on Bainbridge Island, Wash. Ron Wurzer/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Ron Wurzer/Getty Images

Parallel processing: Couscous cooks in the coffee maker's carafe while broccoli and cauliflower steam in the basket. Morgan Walker/ NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Morgan Walker/ NPR

Food writer Dan Pashman says poached pears are great in the dishwasher. We're not sure about the asparagus, but we'll let you know after the cycle finishes. Maggie Starbard/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Maggie Starbard/NPR

Jessica McConnell, 26, of Silver Spring, Md., tries to identify halibut, red snapper and salmon at a dinner hosted by Oceana and the National Aquarium in Washington, D.C. Heather Rousseau/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Heather Rousseau/NPR

Bright red sockeye salmon swim up the Fraser River to the stream where they were hatched. Current Biology, Putman et al. hide caption

itoggle caption Current Biology, Putman et al.