An employee at the American Disposables Inc. factory works on the assembly line in October 2009 in Ware, Mass. The state has seen rapidly expanding income disparity in the past 50 years as highly educated tech and financial workers have seen big gains and inflation-adjusted income has shrunk for the poorest residents. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Maggie Barcellano prepares dinner in January 2014 at her father's house in Austin, Texas. Barcellano, who lives with her father, enrolled in the food stamps program while she works as a home health aide and raises her 3-year-old daughter. A study suggests that social safety nets, including food stamps, helped cushion income losses for middle- and working-class Americans during the recession. Tamir Kalifa/AP hide caption

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Tamir Kalifa/AP

Study Suggests Recession, Recovery Have Not Left The Rich Richer

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Residents look on as Brazilian military police officers patrol Mare, one of the largest complexes of favelas in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, on March 30. In one of the world's most violent countries, homicide rates are dropping — but only for whites. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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In Brazil, Race Is A Matter Of Life And Violent Death

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People wait to sign up for unemployment Sept. 3 at the Atlantic City Convention Center in Atlantic City, N.J., where thousands of workers at the closing Revel and Showboat casinos recently were laid off. Mel Evans/AP hide caption

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Lower-income residents may find affordable housing hard to come by in Manhattan. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

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Seth Wenig/AP

New York Skyscraper's Separate 'Poor Door' Called A Disgrace

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Florida Sen. Marco Rubio, shown here at an event in Washington last month, spoke with NPR's Morning Edition about the country's economic challenges. Molly Riley/AP hide caption

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Molly Riley/AP

Rubio: Small Government Can Help Fix Economic Inequality

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Prince Charles talks to Lynn Forester de Rothschild (left), organizer of the Conference on Inclusive Capitalism, and Christine Lagarde, head of the International Monetary Fund, before Tuesday's conference. The 250 corporate and financial leaders who attended control some $30 trillion, about a third of the world's investable assets. WPA Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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World's Richest People Meet, Muse On How To Spread The Wealth

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London's financial district, known as the Square Mile. Will it be one of the first dominoes to fall when society can no longer sustain itself? Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images hide caption

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