Dr. Harry Selker, a cardiologist, works on collaborations to improve delivery of medical care. M. Scott Brauer for NPR hide caption

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M. Scott Brauer for NPR

This Doctor Is Trying To Stop Heart Attacks In Their Tracks

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Andrew Baker/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Are We Reaching The End Of The Trend For Longer, Healthier Lives?

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This synthetic stingray is made of gold, silicone and live muscle cells from a rat. Scientists use pulses of light to guide its propulsion. Karaghen Hudson and Michael Rosnach/Science hide caption

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Karaghen Hudson and Michael Rosnach/Science

Synthetic Stingray May Lead To A Better Artificial Heart

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Linda Johns (lower row, center), in the first moments of her heart attack. She's with fellow authors Kristen Kittscher, Kirby Larson, Suzanne Selfors, Sara Nickerson and Jennifer Longo at Queen Anne Book Co. in Seattle. Courtesy of Linda Johns hide caption

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Courtesy of Linda Johns

Tracy Solomon Clark didn't realize that the shortness of breath and dizziness she felt at age 44 was actually serious heart disease. Benjamin Brian Morris for NPR hide caption

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Benjamin Brian Morris for NPR

Hidden Heart Disease Is The Top Health Threat For U.S. Women

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Katherine Streeter for NPR

What's Good For The Heart Is Good For The Brain

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People who drink in moderation tend to be better educated and more well off, which increases their odds of being healthy. Photographer: Katsiaryna Pakhoma/iStockphoto hide caption

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Photographer: Katsiaryna Pakhoma/iStockphoto

Ben Lecomte has swum across the Atlantic Ocean, and now he aims to traverse the Pacific, which will take him five or six months. Bongani Mlambo/The Longest Swim hide caption

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Bongani Mlambo/The Longest Swim

Can Extreme Exercise Hurt Your Heart? Swim The Pacific To Find Out

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Todd Davidson/Illustration Works/Corbis

Gratitude Is Good For The Soul And Helps The Heart, Too

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"Because he wasn't raised where health was an issue in the household. There was nobody talkin' about health, probably nobody talking about not smoking or drinking or unhealthy practices, what it could lead to. There was nobody talkin' about that." National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion hide caption

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National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion

Aspirin can lower the risk of heart attacks, but there's concern that it's being overused. Jim DeLillo/iStockphoto hide caption

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Jim DeLillo/iStockphoto

Panel Says Aspirin Lowers Heart Attack Risk For Some

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Researchers say poor sleep quality, too much sleep and too little sleep all play a role in heart health. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Good Quality Sleep May Build Healthy Hearts

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