A production facility that created lead paint and other lead products once stood at Almond and Cumberland Streets, across Aramingo Avenue in Philadelphia. Kimberly Paynter/WHYY hide caption

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Calls Continue For EPA To Clean Up Former Lead Production Site In Philly

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A Volkswagen Passat is tested for exhaust emissions, at a Ministry of Transport testing station in London. In the U.S., a 1998 copyright law prevents safety researchers from accessing the software that runs cars. John Stillwell/PA Photos/Landov hide caption

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Amid VW Scandal, Critics Want Access To Carmakers' Computer Code

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Matthias Mueller, new chief executive of Volkswagen AG, attends a news conference at the VW factory in in Wolfsburg, Germany, on Friday. Mueller takes over after Martin Winterkorn resigned earlier this week amid a diesel emissions-testing scandal. Julian Stratenschulte/EPA/Landov hide caption

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Volkswagen CEO Martin Winterkorn (left) apologized for his company's actions, saying, "We do not and will not tolerate violations of any kind of our internal rules or of the law." He's seen here on the first day of the Frankfurt Auto Show last Thursday, one day before the EPA said VW had cheated on emissions tests. Jens Meyer/AP hide caption

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Volkswagen Jetta models — like this TDI from 2011 labeled "clean diesel" — were found to have software that cheated official emissions tests, the EPA says. More than 480,000 cars are affected. Ramin Talaie/Getty Images hide caption

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After the Animas River spill, rancher Irving Shaggy is forced to travel a 70-mile round trip to get water for his livestock. "It's going to be a long struggle," he says. Laurel Morales/KJZZ hide caption

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Navajo Nation Farmers Feel The Weight Of Colorado Mine Spill

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A coal scraper machine works on a pile of coal at American Electric Power's Mountaineer coal power plant in 2009 in New Haven, W.Va. The state, in which coal mining is a major industry, is one party planning to sue the Environmental Protection Agency regarding new power plant regulations announced Monday. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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New Power Plant Rules Likely To Start Slow-Burning Debate, Legal Action

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The gurney in the the execution chamber at the Oklahoma State Penitentiary in McAlester, Okla. On Monday the Supreme Court voted 5-4 in a case from Oklahoma that the sedative midazolam can be used in executions without violating the prohibition on cruel and unusual punishment. Sue Ogrocki/AP hide caption

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Supreme Court Concludes Term With Death Penalty Ruling, Looks Ahead

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A plume of steam billows from the coal-fired Merrimack Station in Bow, N.H. in January 2015. Jim Cole/AP hide caption

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Supreme Court Rules In Industry's Favor. What's EPA's Next Move?

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Crews perform dredging work along the upper Hudson River in Waterford, N.Y. General Electric's cleanup of PCBs discharged into the river decades ago will end this year. Mike Groll/AP hide caption

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Once Feared, Now Celebrated, Hudson River Cleanup Nears Its End

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Steam from a coal-fired power plant is silhouetted against the sun near St. Marys, Kan. Industry groups say there should be a far more aggressive consideration of costs of regulation than the Obama administration took into account. Charlie Riedel/AP hide caption

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Obama Administration Emissions Rules Face Supreme Court Test

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Melissa Downer and her family moved to Camp Minden, La., 11 years ago and live on three acres. The mother of three young daughters says they'll move if the M6 is burned in the open air. Kate Archer Kent/Red River Radio hide caption

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EPA Push For Massive Munitions Burn Ignites Opposition In Louisiana

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