Environmental Protection Agency Environmental Protection Agency

Participants look at a world map showing climate anomalies during the World Climate Change Conference 2015 in France. A draft government report on climate, which was released by The New York Times ahead of publication, says the U.S. is already experiencing the consequences of global warming. Stephane Mahe/Reuters hide caption

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Stephane Mahe/Reuters

A pump jack at work in 2016, near Firestone, Colo. The American Exploration & Production Council, which represents oil and gas exploration firms, is one of many industry groups supporting the HONEST Act, which was passed by the House and is now with the Senate. David Zalubowski/AP hide caption

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David Zalubowski/AP

GOP Effort To Make Environmental Science 'Transparent' Worries Scientists

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A comprehensive study of air pollution in the U.S. finds it still kills thousands a year, and disproportionately affects poor people and minorities. Robert Nickelsberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Robert Nickelsberg/Getty Images

U.S. Air Pollution Still Kills Thousands Every Year, Study Concludes

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Pesticide warning sign in an orange grove. The sign, in English and Spanish, warns that the pesticide chlorpyrifos, or Lorsban, has been applied to these orange trees. Jim West/Science Source hide caption

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Jim West/Science Source

EPA Decides Not To Ban A Pesticide, Despite Its Own Evidence Of Risk

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NASA's Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 monitors how the climate is changing. Trump's budget would eliminate some satellites, including OCO-3, a next-generation carbon-monitoring spacecraft. NASA hide caption

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NASA

Trump's Budget Slashes Climate Change Funding

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President Trump released his budget blueprint on Thursday, calling for a boost in military spending and deep cuts in the Environmental Protection Agency and other programs. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Trump Unveils 'Hard Power' Budget That Boosts Military Spending

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The CAFE standards that set fuel efficiency marks for the auto industry will be reopened for review, the Trump administration says. Here, vehicles refuel at a roadside gas station in New Mexico. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg via Getty Images

EPA Reopens U.S. Rules Setting Vehicle Efficiency Standards For 2025

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Scott Pruitt's comments on carbon dioxide come just over two weeks after he took the helm of the Environmental Protection Agency, the agency with the authority to regulate CO2 and other greenhouse gases as pollutants. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Nitrogen oxide pollution in India and China is offsetting U.S. gains in cutting emissions, researchers say. This photo from October shows road traffic, along with smoke and smog, in front of the landmark India Gate in New Delhi. Manish Swarup/AP hide caption

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Manish Swarup/AP

William Ruckelshaus is sworn in as administrator of the new Environmental Protection Agency as President Richard Nixon looks on at the White House on Dec. 4, 1970. Charles Tasnadi/AP hide caption

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Charles Tasnadi/AP

How The EPA Became A Victim Of Its Own Success

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Days before this week's Alaska Forum on the Environment, the EPA said it was sending half of the people who had planned to attend. The nomination of Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt, President Trump's pick to head the EPA, is still pending confirmation. Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images hide caption

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Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images

Adam Scott of Australia plays during the World Golf Championships-Cadillac Championship at the Trump National Doral Blue Monster course in 2016. David Cannon/Getty Images hide caption

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David Cannon/Getty Images

Doug Ericksen, a Washington state senator who is the head of communications for the Trump administration's EPA transition team, listens to testimony during a hearing in Olympia, Wash., in 2013. Rachel La Corte/AP hide caption

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Rachel La Corte/AP