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Why We're All Trapped In 3-D

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Albert Einstein once wrote that he was indebted to a favorite uncle for giving him a toy steam engine when he was a boy, launching a lifelong interest in science. AP hide caption

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AP

Einstein Saw Space Move, Long Before We Could Hear It

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An image from a simulation of two black holes merging. Courtesy of SXS Collaboration hide caption

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Courtesy of SXS Collaboration

Einstein, A Hunch And Decades Of Work: How Scientists Found Gravitational Waves

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A Star-Crossed 'Scientific Fact': The Story Of Vulcan, Planet That Never Was

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This artist's impression shows the surroundings of the supermassive black hole at the heart of the active galaxy NGC 3783 in the southern constellation of Centaurus. M. Kornmesser/ESO hide caption

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M. Kornmesser/ESO
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Falling: How To Meet Einstein In An Elevator

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William Thomson Kelvin (1824 - 1907) who proposed the absolute or Kelvin temperature scale. He also established the second law of thermo-dynamics. He was brilliant. But he wasn't perfect. W. & D. Downey/Getty Images hide caption

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W. & D. Downey/Getty Images

Pathologist Thomas Harvey took dozens of photos of Einstein's brain. This one shows that Einstein's prefrontal cortex (associated with higher cognition and memory) is unusually convoluted. On the right side of the brain there are four large ridges, where most people have only three. Brain(2012)/National Museum of Health and Medicine hide caption

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Brain(2012)/National Museum of Health and Medicine

A detail from what is thought to be one of only three existing manuscripts containing Einstein's most famous formula about the relationship between energy, mass and the speed of light — in his handwriting. Sean Carberry/NPR hide caption

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Sean Carberry/NPR

Brilliant Idea: More Than 80,000 Of Einstein's Documents Going Online

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