Clockwise from top left: General Mills, Nestle, Dunkin Donuts, Panera, Tyson Chicken and McDonald's, among other big food companies, made commitments in 2015 to change the way they prepare and procure their food products. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg/Getty; Justin Sullivan/Getty; Susana Gonzalez/Bloomberg/Getty; Daniel Acker/Bloomberg/Getty; Paul Sakuma/AP; Ulrich Baumgarten/Getty hide caption

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Daniel Acker/Bloomberg/Getty; Justin Sullivan/Getty; Susana Gonzalez/Bloomberg/Getty; Daniel Acker/Bloomberg/Getty; Paul Sakuma/AP; Ulrich Baumgarten/Getty

The Year In Food: Artificial Out, Innovation In (And 2 More Trends)

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A man scans a voucher code in with his smartphone. Some food companies use labels like this to provide details about ingredients and manufacturing processes to consumers. iStockphoto hide caption

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Can Big Food Win Friends By Revealing Its Secrets?

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The food industry has processed lots of foods to hit that "bliss point" — that perfect amount of sweetness that would send eaters over the moon. In doing so, it's added sweetness in plenty of unexpected places – like bread and pasta sauce, says investigative reporter Michael Moss. Yagi Studio/Getty Images hide caption

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Cocoa pods in Ivory Coast, one of the world's top producers of cocoa. Climate models suggest that West Africa, where much of the world's cocoa is grown, will get drier, which could affect supply. Issouf Sanogo/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Issouf Sanogo/AFP/Getty Images

As Big Food Feels Threat Of Climate Change, Companies Speak Up

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In this 2011 photo, a banner in an Iowa grocery store advertises "pork, the other white meat" — the former, long-running slogan of the National Pork Board. Funded by money collected by the federal government, the board is one of a dozen promotional funds for different parts of American agriculture. Charlie Neibergall/AP hide caption

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Charlie Neibergall/AP

Why Does Government Act As Tax Collector For Agribusiness?

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Vani Hari, known as the "Food Babe," speaks at the Green Festival in Los Angeles on Sept. 12. Hari has made a name for herself by investigating ingredients in Big Food products that she deems potentially harmful. But critics accuse her of stoking unfounded fears. Jonathan Alcorn/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Jonathan Alcorn/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Patrick McCoy (right) and Harry Fowler of Schwan's Food Service show off their company's Big Daddy's pizza at the School Nutrition Association's national conference in Chicago in 2007. Brian Kersey/AP hide caption

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Brian Kersey/AP

Lobbyists Loom Behind The Scenes Of School Nutrition Fight

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Chipotle Mexican Grill launched The Scarecrow, an arcade-style adventure game for iPhone, iPad and iPod touch. Business Wire hide caption

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Business Wire
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How The Food Industry Manipulates Taste Buds With 'Salt Sugar Fat'

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