Just Coffee Cooperative's Benjamin Lisser prepares to grind coffee. The glass tube on his vest tests the air in his breathing zone for diacetyl, a chemical byproduct of the coffee roasting process that can cause lung disease. Mike De Sisti/Milwaukee Journal Sentinel/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mike De Sisti/Milwaukee Journal Sentinel/TNS via Getty Images

Coffee Workers' Concerns Brew Over Chemical's Link To Lung Disease

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/474325037/474325038" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Emmanuel Baziruwile, 54, works at a coffee plantation in Cyimbiri, Rwanda. Erika Beras for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Erika Beras for NPR

Rwanda Tries To Persuade Its Citizens To Drink The Coffee They Grow

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/469037646/471161724" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Cascara is made by brewing dried coffee cherries, which typically would have otherwise ended up as compost. "We have been throwing away this perfectly good coffee fruit for a long time, and there's no real reason for it, because it tastes delicious," says Peter Giuliano, of the Specialty Coffee Association of America. Murray Carpenter for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Murray Carpenter for NPR

People who drank three to five cups of coffee per day had a lower risk of premature death than those who didn't drink, a new study finds. iStockphoto hide caption

toggle caption
iStockphoto

Drink To Your Health: Study Links Daily Coffee Habit To Longevity

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/456191657/456395487" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Elena Biamon holds coffee berries grown on her farm near Jayuya, a town in Puerto Rico's mountainous interior. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Greg Allen/NPR

Puerto Rico Wants To Grow Your Next Cup Of Specialty Coffee

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/404228117/406358766" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A police officer blamed Starbucks after his hot coffee spilled, saying it resulted in burns and other medical problems. A jury in Raleigh, N.C., does not agree. Joe Skipper/Reuters /Landov hide caption

toggle caption
Joe Skipper/Reuters /Landov

A daily cup of joe (or two) may help protect against Type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. And an egg a day will not raise the risk of heart disease in healthy people, according to a panel of nutrition experts. Premshee Pillai/Flickr hide caption

toggle caption
Premshee Pillai/Flickr

Nutrition Panel: Egg With Coffee Is A-OK, But Skip The Side Of Bacon

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/387517506/387554274" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

"Greek coffee" may be a matter of national pride in the Mediterranean nation. But increasingly, Greeks are embracing espresso, an imported brew, as their cup of Joe of choice. Pawel Loj/Flickr hide caption

toggle caption
Pawel Loj/Flickr

Jay Ruskey grows coffee next to avocados on his farm, Good Land Organics, in Goleta, Calif. The two crops are often grown together in Central America, partly because they can share fertilizer and water. Lisa Morehouse/KQED hide caption

toggle caption
Lisa Morehouse/KQED

A Haitian woman holds cherries from a coffee tree. Haiti's coffee trade was once a flourishing industry, but it has been crippled by decades of deforestation, political chaos and now, climate change. Patrick Farrell /MCT /Landov hide caption

toggle caption
Patrick Farrell /MCT /Landov

Climate Change Has Coffee Growers In Haiti Seeking Higher Ground

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/357589088/357628485" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In some parts of the U.S., Starbucks is testing a latte flavored with roasted-stout notes along with its seasonal autumn drinks such as the Pumpkin Spice Latte, seen here at front. Starbucks hide caption

toggle caption
Starbucks

Elephants, unlike humans or civets, are herbivores. The fermentation happening in their gut as they break down cellulose helps remove the bitterness in the coffee beans. Here, an elephant receives medical treatment from the Golden Triangle Asian Elephant Foundation. Michael Sullivan/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Michael Sullivan/NPR

No. 1 Most Expensive Coffee Comes From Elephant's No. 2

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/340154271/341958795" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A worker dries coffee beans at a coffee plantation in Santiago Atitlan, Guatemala, in February 2013. Moises Castillo/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Moises Castillo/AP

Rust Devastates Guatemala's Prime Coffee Crop And Its Farmers

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/335293974/335986207" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript