Flavor wheels stem from lexicons, the carefully, often scientifically selected words used to describe a product, be it food, wine, carpet cleaner or dog food. Scott Suchman/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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In the 1970s, Mr. Coffee became iconic, an American byword for drip brewing. By Christmas 1977, department stores were selling more than 40,000 Mr. Coffees a day. Credit for some of that success goes to the machine's longtime pitchman, former New York Yankee Joltin' Joe DiMaggio, seen here in a television commercial from 1978. Richard Drew/AP hide caption

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When Kansas State student Hunter Jobbins left his car parked outside a dorm with the doors unlocked, a passerby saw an opportunity and took it. The opportunity was a Kit-Kat bar in the cup holder and it was gone. Fabrice Coffrini/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ukrainian Man Changes Name To iPhone To Get One Free

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A worker separates coffee cherries during harvest at a plantation in Brazil's Minas Gerais state. Brazil's coffee exports fell to 2.6 million bags in June, a 12 percent drop from a year ago, according to a report last week by Cecafe, the country's coffee export council. Patricia Monteiro/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Coffee And Climate Change: In Brazil, A Disaster Is Brewing

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Associate professor William Ristenpart talks with Sabrina Perell, a community regional development major, and Kyle Phan, an undeclared major, about the taste of their brew during the Design of Coffee class last October at UC Davis. Students learn the science of coffee, from roasting to brewing. Gregory Urquiaga/UC Davis hide caption

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Gregory Urquiaga/UC Davis

STEM To Steam: How Coffee Is Perking Up Engineering Education

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Coffee gets the all-clear from the World Health Organization's cancer research agency. Rob MacEwen/Flickr hide caption

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Java Lovers, Rejoice: Coffee Doesn't Pose A Cancer Risk, WHO Panel Says

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How much ice is just right, legally? Marco Arment/Flickr hide caption

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Ice Is Nice, But Do I Have To Say Venti To Get A Large Coffee?

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Just Coffee Cooperative's Benjamin Lisser prepares to grind coffee. The glass tube on his vest tests the air in his breathing zone for diacetyl, a chemical byproduct of the coffee roasting process that can cause lung disease. Mike De Sisti/Milwaukee Journal Sentinel/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

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Coffee Workers' Concerns Brew Over Chemical's Link To Lung Disease

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Emmanuel Baziruwile, 54, works at a coffee plantation in Cyimbiri, Rwanda. Erika Beras for NPR hide caption

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Rwanda Tries To Persuade Its Citizens To Drink The Coffee They Grow

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Cascara is made by brewing dried coffee cherries, which typically would have otherwise ended up as compost. "We have been throwing away this perfectly good coffee fruit for a long time, and there's no real reason for it, because it tastes delicious," says Peter Giuliano, of the Specialty Coffee Association of America. Murray Carpenter for NPR hide caption

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Murray Carpenter for NPR

People who drank three to five cups of coffee per day had a lower risk of premature death than those who didn't drink, a new study finds. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Drink To Your Health: Study Links Daily Coffee Habit To Longevity

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Elena Biamon holds coffee berries grown on her farm near Jayuya, a town in Puerto Rico's mountainous interior. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Puerto Rico Wants To Grow Your Next Cup Of Specialty Coffee

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A police officer blamed Starbucks after his hot coffee spilled, saying it resulted in burns and other medical problems. A jury in Raleigh, N.C., does not agree. Joe Skipper/Reuters /Landov hide caption

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Joe Skipper/Reuters /Landov

A daily cup of joe (or two) may help protect against Type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. And an egg a day will not raise the risk of heart disease in healthy people, according to a panel of nutrition experts. Premshee Pillai/Flickr hide caption

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Premshee Pillai/Flickr

Nutrition Panel: Egg With Coffee Is A-OK, But Skip The Side Of Bacon

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"Greek coffee" may be a matter of national pride in the Mediterranean nation. But increasingly, Greeks are embracing espresso, an imported brew, as their cup of Joe of choice. Pawel Loj/Flickr hide caption

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Jay Ruskey grows coffee next to avocados on his farm, Good Land Organics, in Goleta, Calif. The two crops are often grown together in Central America, partly because they can share fertilizer and water. Lisa Morehouse/KQED hide caption

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