Japanese women drink green tea during an outdoor tea ceremony in Kobe, Japan. Making the brew a daily habit may be protective against stroke. Buddhika Weerasinghe/Getty Images hide caption

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A Daily Habit Of Green Tea Or Coffee Cuts Stroke Risk

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Students are drinking more coffee to stay awake. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Young Adults Swapping Soda For The Super Buzz Of Coffee

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The baristas at Chinatown Coffee in Washington, D.C., were suspicious of the dark color of the beans, but pleased with the taste. Claire O'Neill/NPR hide caption

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For many who work in the food service industry, coffee can make or break their day, according to a new survey. Many scientists and sales reps also said their day suffers if they don't have a cup. Stan Honda/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Welcome to Rwanda's coffee land, where some of the world's best coffee is grown. Here, Minani Anastase, president of Musasa Coffee Cooperative in northern Rwanda, looks over the coffee drying tables. Courtesy of Jonathan Kalan hide caption

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Bring on the caffeine — maybe. antwerpenR/Flickr.com hide caption

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Can Coffee Help You Live Longer? We Really Want To Know

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In India, Starbucks will have to compete with this locally-owned coffee chain, Cafe Coffee Day. Aijaz Rahi/AP hide caption

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A coffee grower picks coffee fruits in a plantation near Montenegro in Quindio province, Colombia. Fair Trade USA wants to allow coffee from big estates like this one under its fair trade label. Jose Miguel Gomez/Reuters /Landov hide caption

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Is Fair Trade Coffee Still Fair If It Comes From A Big Farm?

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Flickr user Jennifer Yin notes that at Spro in the Hampden neighborhood of Baltimore, they sell $14 coffee. Jennifer Yin/Flickr hide caption

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