Coffee gets the all-clear from the World Health Organization's cancer research agency. Rob MacEwen/Flickr hide caption

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Java Lovers, Rejoice: Coffee Doesn't Pose A Cancer Risk, WHO Panel Says

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How much ice is just right, legally? Marco Arment/Flickr hide caption

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Ice Is Nice, But Do I Have To Say Venti To Get A Large Coffee?

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Just Coffee Cooperative's Benjamin Lisser prepares to grind coffee. The glass tube on his vest tests the air in his breathing zone for diacetyl, a chemical byproduct of the coffee roasting process that can cause lung disease. Mike De Sisti/Milwaukee Journal Sentinel/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

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Coffee Workers' Concerns Brew Over Chemical's Link To Lung Disease

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Emmanuel Baziruwile, 54, works at a coffee plantation in Cyimbiri, Rwanda. Erika Beras for NPR hide caption

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Rwanda Tries To Persuade Its Citizens To Drink The Coffee They Grow

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Cascara is made by brewing dried coffee cherries, which typically would have otherwise ended up as compost. "We have been throwing away this perfectly good coffee fruit for a long time, and there's no real reason for it, because it tastes delicious," says Peter Giuliano, of the Specialty Coffee Association of America. Murray Carpenter for NPR hide caption

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People who drank three to five cups of coffee per day had a lower risk of premature death than those who didn't drink, a new study finds. iStockphoto hide caption

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Drink To Your Health: Study Links Daily Coffee Habit To Longevity

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Elena Biamon holds coffee berries grown on her farm near Jayuya, a town in Puerto Rico's mountainous interior. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Puerto Rico Wants To Grow Your Next Cup Of Specialty Coffee

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A police officer blamed Starbucks after his hot coffee spilled, saying it resulted in burns and other medical problems. A jury in Raleigh, N.C., does not agree. Joe Skipper/Reuters /Landov hide caption

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A daily cup of joe (or two) may help protect against Type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. And an egg a day will not raise the risk of heart disease in healthy people, according to a panel of nutrition experts. Premshee Pillai/Flickr hide caption

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Nutrition Panel: Egg With Coffee Is A-OK, But Skip The Side Of Bacon

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