A box of 3-D models 24-year-old student Amos Dudley made of his teeth. The model labeled "3" rests on a 3-D-printed tray Dudley made to make impressions of his teeth with a putty-like material. Also in the box are a clear plastic aligner and other 3-D models used to make more aligners, each one pushing the problematic teeth further into place. Jon Kalish for NPR hide caption

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New Jersey Student Uses 3-D Printer For DIY Dental Work

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Say aaaaaah! Dental caries and other signs of oral disease are plain to see in the upper teeth of this hunter-gatherer, between 14,000 and 15,000 years old. The findings challenge the idea that the original paleo diet was inherently healthy, says paleo-anthropologist Louise Humphrey. It all depended, she says, on what wild foods were available. Courtesy of Isabelle De Groote hide caption

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Looks Like The Paleo Diet Wasn't Always So Hot For Ancient Teeth

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Anthropologists say early humans who hunted and gathered had longer jaws to hold all those teeth. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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