Public safety Public safety

Earthquake survivors look at a collapsed building in Istanbul in August 1999. The magnitude 7.4 quake killed 17,000 people across northwestern Turkey. Eyal Warshavsky/AP hide caption

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Eyal Warshavsky/AP

18 Years After Turkey's Deadly Quake, Safety Concerns Grow About The Next Big One

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Phoenix police move protesters away after using tear gas outside the Phoenix Convention Center, where President Trump hosted a rally, earlier this week. Matt York/AP hide caption

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Matt York/AP

Police Struggle To Balance Public Safety With Free Speech During Protests

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Chicago's Fire Department has only half as many ambulances as it has fire vehicles, but it gets 20 times more medical calls than fire calls these days. Monica Eng/WBEZ hide caption

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Monica Eng/WBEZ

Why Send A Firetruck To Do An Ambulance's Job?

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Hit-and-run accidents in California decreased by as much as 10 percent after the state passed a law in 2013 granting driver's licenses to unauthorized immigrants, say researchers at Stanford University. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

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David McNew/Getty Images

Drivers distracted by their devices are a well-documented, rising cause of traffic crashes, but there are a growing number of pedestrians, too, who can become oblivious to traffic around them. Bebeto Matthews/AP hide caption

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Bebeto Matthews/AP

Distraction, On Street And Sidewalk, Helps Cause Record Pedestrian Deaths

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LA Johnson/NPR

How Should Schools Train For Active Shooters?

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Rodney Earl Sanders, 46, of Kosciusko, who has been charged with two counts of capital murder in connection with the killing of Sister Margaret Held and Sister Paula Merrill. Warren Strain/AP hide caption

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Warren Strain/AP

Residents who used to have to describe where their house was are now getting official home addresses. Carrie Jung/KJZZ hide caption

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Carrie Jung/KJZZ

Navigating Navajo Nation Soon To Be Easier For Amazon, Ambulances

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A shuttle bus exits a secure gate at Napa State Hospital after a media tour in 2011. J.L. Sousa/ZUMAPRESS.com/Corbis hide caption

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J.L. Sousa/ZUMAPRESS.com/Corbis

5 Years After A Murder, Calif. Hospital Still Struggles With Violence

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Pursuit chases have led to crashes, like this one in Leawood, Kan., in 2004, at least 706 times in the last 10 years. Photo courtesy of credit Leawood Police Department/Courtesy of KCPT hide caption

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Photo courtesy of credit Leawood Police Department/Courtesy of KCPT

In Hot Pursuit Of Public Safety, Police Consider Fewer Car Chases

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Corrections officer Sgt. Charles Galaviz secures an inmate for transfer with handcuffs and shackles Jan. 24 at the Lexington Assessment and Reception Center, in Lexington, Okla. Overtime is mandatory for correctional officers in the state's prisons, which have a manpower shortage of about 33 percent and the highest inmate homicide rate in the country. Sue Ogrocki/AP hide caption

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Sue Ogrocki/AP

States Face Correctional Officer Shortage Amid A Cultural Stigma

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An ambulance makes its way through revelers in Cardiff city center in Wales in 2010. New measures in the city have reduced injuries caused by violence. Matt Cardy/Getty Images hide caption

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Matt Cardy/Getty Images

A yard sign opposes a local tax increase to fund public safety in Josephine County, Oregon. The ballot measure reportedly failed by a thin margin. Amelia Templeton/OPB hide caption

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Amelia Templeton/OPB