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Why It Might Not Be A Good Idea To Wipe Out Vampire Bats

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U.S. troops man a roadblock on Dec. 26, 1989, in Panama City, preventing access to the Vatican Embassy where Panamanian leader Manuel Noriega was holed up. The U.S. forces played loud rock music in an attempt to bring Noriega out. He surrendered on Jan. 3, 1990. AP hide caption

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The Caribbean Tradition, an appetizer made with pickled pig's feet, chiriqui beans, and puffed pork skin, at Donde JoseĀ. Chef Carles calls it his version of a ceviche. Kait Bolongaro for NPR hide caption

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A woman builds a fire at a migrant camp on the Costa Rica-Panama border. The area has seen a recent surge of migrants coming from Africa, hoping to make it to the U.S. Rolando Arrieta/NPR hide caption

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Via Cargo Ships and Jungle Treks, Africans Dream Of Reaching The U.S.

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The head of the Panama Canal Authority, Jorge Quijano, center, opens the main valve to allow water into the flood chambers on the new set of locks on the Atlantic side of the Panama Canal in June 2015. The expansion of the canal, making it wider and deeper to accommodate larger ships, has taken nearly a decade. It opens next month. Tito Herrera/AP hide caption

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A Wider, Deeper Panama Canal Prepares To Open Its Locks

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Panama's economy, expected to grow by 6 percent this year, is a bright spot in Latin America. Many Panamanians believe their country has been unfairly tarnished by the Panama Papers revelations. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Panama Papers Fallout Hurts A Reputation Panama Thought It Had Fixed

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Panamanian salsa singer Ruben Blades waves to the crowd before performing during the final round of Tango Salon competition at the 8th Tango Dance World Championship in Buenos Aires on August 30, 2010. MABROMATA/AFP/Getty Images) Juan Mabromata /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Cuban President Raul Castro and President Obama shake hands as they meet on the sidelines of the Summit of the Americas in Panama City, Panama, on Saturday. It was the first substantive talk between leaders of the two countries in more than five decades. Pool/Scott Horsley hide caption

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A family swims in Lake Nicaragua, which will encompass nearly half of the proposed canal's 172-mile route. Environmentalists worry that oil spills, pollution and dredging will destroy the country's largest supply of fresh water. Carrie Kahn/NPR hide caption

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A Chinese Man, A $50 Billion Plan And A Canal To Reshape Nicaragua

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President of Panama, Ricardo Martinelli (left), talks next to Spain's Minister of Public Works and Transport, Ana Pastor, during a news conference after a meeting at the Presidential Palace in Panama City, Panama, on Monday. Alejandro Bolivar/EPA/Landov hide caption

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Men sit by the side of the Panama Canal as a ship sails past in Gamboa near Panama City, last month. The expansion project is aimed at accommodating the world's largest container ships. Arnulfo Franco/AP hide caption

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Arnulfo Franco/AP