Christine Ristaino, with her son, Benny Smith, on a recent visit with StoryCorps. StoryCorps hide caption

toggle caption StoryCorps

Even Seizures Can't Slow This Sixth-Grader: 'Nothing Can Stop Me!'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/466414706/466512387" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A strain of high-cannabidiol marijuana is used to create extracts used in experimental epilepsy treatments. GW Pharmaceuticals hide caption

toggle caption GW Pharmaceuticals

Marijuana Extract May Help Some Children With Epilepsy, Study Finds

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/458818829/459637433" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The dream of epilepsy research, says neurobiologist Ivan Soltesz, is to stop seizures by manipulating only some brain cells, not all. Steve Zylius/UC Irvine Communications hide caption

toggle caption Steve Zylius/UC Irvine Communications

One Scientist's Quest To Vanquish Epileptic Seizures

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/304353388/304574164" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A technique called optogenetics is being used in the laboratory to observe and control what brain circuits are doing in real time. Henning Dalhoff/Getty Images/Science Photo Library RM hide caption

toggle caption Henning Dalhoff/Getty Images/Science Photo Library RM

Experimental Tool Uses Light To Tweak The Living Brain

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/256881128/257394321" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Surgeons use a grid of electrodes laid on a patient's brain. They record electrical activity and can deliver a tiny jolt. Courtesy of Dr. Josef Parvizi hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of Dr. Josef Parvizi

Epilepsy Patients Help Decode The Brain's Hidden Signals

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/248999497/249652823" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Gabapentin, sold under the brand name Neurontin, helps some people cut down on drinking. iStockphoto.com hide caption

toggle caption iStockphoto.com

In epilepsy, the normal behavior of brain neurons is disturbed. The drug valproic acid appears to help the brain replenish a key chemical, preventing seizures. David Mack/Science Source hide caption

toggle caption David Mack/Science Source

Barton Holmes, 2, sits with his father, Kevin Holmes, and his mother, Catherine McEaddy Holmes, during an appointment at Children's National Medical Center in Washington, D.C. Maggie Starbard/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Maggie Starbard/NPR

With Epilepsy Treatment, The Goal Is To Keep Kids Seizure-Free

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/188639089/190270780" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

With a little help and guidance, epileptic teens can have most of the same experiences as their peers, including learning to drive. iStockphoto.com hide caption

toggle caption iStockphoto.com

With Help, Teens Can Manage Epilepsy

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/142866521/142892981" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript