Iranian sanctions Iranian sanctions

A woman in Tehran stands in front of a wall plastered with posters of Iranian President Hassan Rouhani, whose re-election bid will have its decisive moment Friday — unless, of course, the voting results in a runoff. Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images

Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif said Tuesday that Iran's missile program is purely defensive. The U.S. announced new sanctions on individuals and companies it says support Iran's ballistic missile program. Vahid Salemi/AP hide caption

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Vahid Salemi/AP

House Speaker Paul Ryan meets with reporters on Thursday. He said he would support additional sanctions on Iran following a ballistic missile test over the weekend. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Chicago-based aircraft manufacturer Boeing would not divulge details about its deal with Iran Air — not the number of aircraft involved, the specific models or the price tag. Simon Dawson/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Simon Dawson/Bloomberg via Getty Images

A ranch manager holds pistachios at a farm in Madera, Calif. The lifting of sanctions on Iran has California growers worried that Iranian pistachios will flood the U.S. market. Justin Kase Conder/AP hide caption

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Justin Kase Conder/AP

The Iranian private airline Mahan Air uses Airbus planes, like the one pictured here at Yemen's Sanaa airport in 2015. Tehran is in talks with Airbus to buy more than 100 additional passenger planes. Hani Mohammed/AP hide caption

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Hani Mohammed/AP

As Sanctions On Iran Are Lifted, Many U.S. Business Restrictions Remain

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An Iranian man walks past a mural displaying an outline of Iran, adorned in the colors of the country's national flag, on June 29 in Tehran. A large majority of Iranians appears to support the nuclear deal. Bherouz Mehri/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Bherouz Mehri/AFP/Getty Images

Hear NPR's Special, The U.S., The Atom and Iran

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Iranian workers transfer goods from a cargo container to trucks in May at the Kalantari port in Chabahar, Iran. The removal of sanctions on Iran under a recent deal with world powers is expected to boost the country's economy, but the agreement was carefully constructed to quickly put those sanctions back in place if Iran is suspected of violations. Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images

A Look At How Sanctions Would 'Snap Back' If Iran Violates Nuke Deal

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To Iranian Business Leader, Nuclear Pact Opens Long-Awaited Opportunities

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A man walks past a poster advertising travel to Tehran, Iran, in Los Angeles on July 14. A nuclear deal between Iran and six world powers lifts some sanctions against Iran, but most U.S. sanctions will remain in place. Lucy Nicholson/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Lucy Nicholson/Reuters/Landov

What Lifting Iran's Sanctions Means For U.S. Businesses

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President Obama hosts leaders of the Gulf Cooperation Council at Camp David, Md., on May 14. The president gave assurances that the U.S. would support its allies in the region concerned over Iran's growing influence. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Iran Nuclear Pact Could Spark Buildup Of Conventional Weapons

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Iranian oil workers gather at an oil refinery south of the capital Tehran, Dec. 22, 2014. Iran's oil exports have been crippled by sanctions. Vahid Salemi/AP hide caption

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Vahid Salemi/AP

Framework Nuclear Deal Could Be Good News For Iran's Oil Sector

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