Woohoo! Get wild, all ye Starbucks employees. Now crew necks are acceptable work wear! Starbucks hide caption

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Starbucks' New Dress Code: Purple Hair And Fedoras OK, But Hoodies Forbidden

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The writer, Rachael Cusick, is pictured with chef Oneil Wilson, her co-worker in the kitchen during a summer job as a line cook, during the breakfast shift. Courtesy of Rachael Cusick hide caption

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At fine-dining places, white workers overwhelmingly fill jobs with the heftiest salaries, while Latinos, blacks and other minorities have jobs with pay closer to the poverty level, a study finds. iStockphoto hide caption

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Fast-food workers in Los Angeles march in August 2013 to raise the minimum wage to $15 an hour. Similar protests around the country have been organized by labor unions. Nick Ut/AP hide caption

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Unions Have Pushed The $15 Minimum Wage, But Few Members Will Benefit

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Srirupa Dasgupta opened Upohar, a restaurant and catering service, with a social mission. Her employees — primarily refugees — earn double the minimum wage. Jeff Brady/NPR hide caption

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A Restaurant That Serves Up A Side Of Social Goals

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Fast-food workers march toward the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C., on Thursday. Similar rallies occurred in about 100 cities across the U.S. Morgan Walker/NPR hide caption

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McDonald's USA President Jeff Stratton responds to an employee who burst into an event. YouTube screengrab hide caption

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A group that advocates on behalf of food service workers has created an app that helps diners find restaurants that pay their workers livable wages and offer room for advancement. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Culinary student Nadya Dunkley cooks chicken at Colors Restaurant in New York. The restaurant scored highly in a new guide that rates restaurants based on the way they treat employees. Kathy Willens/AP hide caption

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