Black mambas are one of the fastest snakes in the world and grow up to 14 feet long. But their venom is no match for the antidote Fav-Afrique. Balint Porneczi/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Goats and Soda

The World Is Running Out Of A Critical Snakebite Antidote

If a venomous snake bites you in Africa, you're likely to survive when you're near a hospital. That might not be the case next year.

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An illustration of Pappochelys, based on its 240-million-year-old fossilized remains. This ancestor to today's turtle was about 8 inches long. Rainer Schoch/Nature hide caption

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The most recent common ancestor of all today's snakes likely lived 120 million years ago. Scientists believe it used needle-like hooked teeth to grab rodent-like creatures that it then swallowed whole. Julius Csotonyi/BMC Evolutionary Biology hide caption

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Saw-scaled vipers may be small, but they pack a nasty venomous punch. This one, Echis carinatus sochureki, was used in a study on snake venom. Courtesy of Wolfgang Wüster hide caption

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Pastor Jamie Coots holds a snake at Full Gospel Tabernacle in Jesus Name Church of Middlesboro, Ky. He died on Sunday after being bitten by a snake. NGO hide caption

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The bite of a cobra can paralyze its victims and, if enough venom is released, fatally stop their breathing. It's estimated that more than 75 percent of patients in India who die from a snake's bite never make it to the hospital. STRDEL/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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A newly discovered disease in boa constrictors could provide the missing link in the latent Ebola virus. hide caption

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Snake handler Subhendu Malllik holds up an Indian baby cobra hatchling after it emerged from an egg on the outskirts of Bhubaneswar, India, in June. The venomous snake is indigenous to South Asia. Asit Kumar/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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