U.S. President Barack Obama disembarks from Air Force One upon his arrival at Hangzhou Xiaoshan International Airport in Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province of China. VCG via Getty Images hide caption

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President Obama met with China's president, Xi Jinping, at an event linked to the international climate conference held late last year outside Paris. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Can The U.S. And China Keep Their Climate Pledges?

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The round-trip flight that NPR's Ari Shapiro took to Paris emitted about a ton of greenhouse gases. Offsetting it cost a dollar, and he was given a white lanyard for his conference ID with the words "Climate Neutral Now" showing his trip was carbon-neutral. Ari Shapiro/NPR hide caption

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How To Stay Carbon-Neutral When Getting To Paris Is Carbon-Costly

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Tony de Brum, the foreign minister of the Marshall Islands, relaxes at the Majuro Atoll last month. Climate change poses an existential threat to places like the Marshall Islands, which rise no higher than 6 feet above sea level in most places. De Brum is representing the Marshall Islands at the climate talks in Paris. Rob Griffith/AP hide caption

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For The Marshall Islands, The Climate Goal Is '1.5 To Stay Alive'

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U.S. Rep. Lamar Smith, R-Texas, and Kathryn Sullivan, director of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, have been tangling for months over the legitimacy of a climate study NOAA scientists published in Science. Drew Angerer/AP; Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Is This Congressman's Oversight An Effort To Hobble Climate Science?

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President Obama (center) and Secretary of State John Kerry (right) attend Monday's opening ceremony of the United Nations Climate Change Conference in the Paris suburb of Le Bourget. Thibault Camus/AP hide caption

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A demonstrator kicks a tear gas canister during clashes with riot police near the Place de la République after the cancellation of a planned climate march. Eric Gaillard /Reuters /Landov hide caption

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Imagine a bar without the booze. Delegates wrangling in Bonn, Germany, this week have to figure out soon how to cover the world's climate bill. Oliver Berg/DPA/Landov hide caption

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How U.N. Climate Negotiations Are Like Splitting A Bar Tab

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Delegates took their seats during the plenary session at the Bonn climate change conference on March 10, 2014. Negotiations resume this week; by the end of the year, the U.N. hopes to have forged a new global agreement. UNclimatechange/Flickr hide caption

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How Are U.N. Climate Talks Like A Middle School? Cliques Rule

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ADP Co-chairs Daniel Reifsnyder (left) and Ahmed Djoghlaf (center) say their negotiation work is difficult but worth it. "We only have one planet, you know," Reifsnyder says. "We have to protect it." Courtesy of IISD/ENB hide caption

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Two Guys In Paris Aim To Charm The World Into Climate Action

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Country representatives listen to opening remarks at the start of the United Nations' Conference of the Parties on Climate Change in Lima, Peru. Cris Bouroncle/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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World Climate Talks In Lima Aim To Move Beyond Kyoto Treaty

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