distracted driving distracted driving

If you haven't had at least seven hours of sleep in the last 24, you probably shouldn't be behind the wheel, traffic safety data suggests. Katja Kircher/Maskot/Getty Images hide caption

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Katja Kircher/Maskot/Getty Images

Drivers Beware: Crash Rate Spikes With Every Hour Of Lost Sleep

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A bill in New York would allow police to examine drivers' phones to see whether they were using the device at the time of an accident. Getty Images/Image Source hide caption

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Getty Images/Image Source

New York Wants To Know: Have You Been Texting And Driving?

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Monitored by researchers and cameras, a study participant drives while using hands-free technology. New AAA research found that these technologies are distracting even after they're used. Dan Campbell/American Automobile Association hide caption

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Dan Campbell/American Automobile Association

A University of Utah volunteer drives through Salt Lake City's Avenues neighborhood as a camera tracks her eye and head movement. Another device records driver reaction time, and a cap fitted with sensors charts brain activity. AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety hide caption

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AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety

A woman uses a cellphone while driving in Los Angeles in 2011. Damian Dovarganes/AP hide caption

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Damian Dovarganes/AP