Honey can be as golden as the sun or as dark as molasses. Researchers have identified over 100 different flavors in it, too, some more savory or stinky than others. Ellen Webber/NPR hide caption

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We knew the Honey Nut Cheerios bee liked sweet stuff. But imagine what would happen if he met green M&M? Doug Kanter/Rusty Jarrett/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Almond trees rely on bees to pollinate during their brief bloom for a few weeks in February. Winfried Rothermel/APN hide caption

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Why California Almonds Need North Dakota Flowers (And A Few Billion Bees)
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A Chinese beekeeper harvests honey beside a rapeseed field in Anhui province. China is a major producer of honey and bee products. AFP/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Funny Honey? Bringing Trust To A Sector Full Of Suspicion
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