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Jacqueline Galant, who resigned as Belgium's transport minister on Friday, says she is the victim of a crusade against her. Dirk Waem/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Dirk Waem/AFP/Getty Images

Dirk van der Maelen, a Social Democratic member of Belgium's Federal Parliament, defends the country's motto, seen here: "Unity makes strength." He think Belgium needs to remain unified, now more than ever. But there are also renewed calls for the country to split into two. Melissa Block/NPR hide caption

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Melissa Block/NPR

Belgium Terrorist Attacks Prompt A Renewed Sectarian Debate

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Playwright Ismaël Saïdi speaks to a mostly-Muslim students at a school in the Brussels district of Laeken, where two suicide-bombers grew up. Teri Schultz for NPR hide caption

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Teri Schultz for NPR

In Tough Brussels District, School Urges Students To Fight Intolerance

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Policemen search passengers at the entrance of the De Brouckere metro station in Brussels on March 24, two days after the terrorist attack on the city. PHILIPPE HUGUEN/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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PHILIPPE HUGUEN/AFP/Getty Images

Investigation Continues As Brussels Recovers From Terror Attacks

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This image provided by the Belgian Federal Police shows a man at Belgium's Zaventem airport whom officials have identified as Ibrahim el Bakraoui. A Belgian prosecutor named him as a suspected suicide bomber in Tuesday's attack on the airport. AP hide caption

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AP

A man wears the Belgian flag as people observe a minute of silence Wednesday at the Place de la Bourse, in honor of the victims of Tuesday's terrorist attacks in Brussels. Christopher Furlong/Getty Images hide caption

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Christopher Furlong/Getty Images

Brussels Attacks, One Day After: What We Know

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Performing in his play Djihad, writer/director and lead actor Ismaël Saïdi plays a character lamenting his life in prison upon returning from fighting in Syria. Courtesy of @djihadcompany hide caption

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Courtesy of @djihadcompany

A Belgian Playwright Tackles Muslim Radicalization With Comedy

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A Belgian soldier patrols Brussels' Grand Place after police say they disrupted a plot to attack during New Year's Eve celebrations in Belgium. Francois Lenoir/Reuters /Landov hide caption

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Francois Lenoir/Reuters /Landov

Paris Prosecutor Francois Molins delivers a press conference Tuesday about the Nov. 13 attacks that claimed 130 lives in the French capital. Loic Venance/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Loic Venance/AFP/Getty Images

Forensics of the French police are at work outside a building in the northern Paris suburb of Saint-Denis, on Thursday, where French Police special forces raided an apartment the day before. Kenzo Tribouillard /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Kenzo Tribouillard /AFP/Getty Images

Dimitri Bontinck spoke with the press at Antwerp's main courthouse in February, when his son Jejoen was among those on trial for taking part in a terrorist organization that allegedly recruited fighters for jihadi groups in Syria. Virginia Mayo/AP hide caption

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Virginia Mayo/AP

A Belgian Father Works To Prevent Kids From Joining The Jihad

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Re-enactors prepare to commemorate the 200th anniversary of Battle of Waterloo in Belgium on Friday. Some 5,000 re-enactors, 300 horses and 100 canons are taking part over two days. Geert Vanden Wijngaert/AP hide caption

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Geert Vanden Wijngaert/AP

At Waterloo Re-Enactment, History So Real You Can Taste It

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Belgium's plan to honor the Battle of Waterloo displeased France. In this photo, an enthusiast dressed as a member of the French army stands next to a cannon before the re-enactment of the famous battle. Thierry Roge/Reuters /Landov hide caption

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Thierry Roge/Reuters /Landov

Belgian paratroopers guard outside a Jewish school in the central city of Antwerp on Saturday, a day after authorities made several arrests of alleged Islamist extremists who they say were plotting attacks. Yves Herman/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Yves Herman/Reuters/Landov

Belgian police block a street in central Verviers on Thursday. Two men were killed and a third arrested when police raided an apartment used by suspected Islamist radicals. Reuters /Landov hide caption

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Reuters /Landov

Frank Van Den Bleeken, seen here at a court hearing last fall, will be sent to a psychiatric center instead of being allowed to die from euthanasia. He had been scheduled to die on Sunday. VIRGINIE LEFOUR/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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VIRGINIE LEFOUR/AFP/Getty Images