Laura Passoni, a Belgian woman who was recruited by ISIS, traveled to Syria and eventually escaped, has written a book to discourage young people who may be tempted to follow the same path. Geert Vanden Wijngaert/AP hide caption

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Geert Vanden Wijngaert/AP

Europe Wakes Up To Prospect Of Female Terrorists

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Jacqueline Galant, who resigned as Belgium's transport minister on Friday, says she is the victim of a crusade against her. Dirk Waem/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Dirk Waem/AFP/Getty Images

Dirk van der Maelen, a Social Democratic member of Belgium's Federal Parliament, defends the country's motto, seen here: "Unity makes strength." He think Belgium needs to remain unified, now more than ever. But there are also renewed calls for the country to split into two. Melissa Block/NPR hide caption

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Melissa Block/NPR

Belgium Terrorist Attacks Prompt A Renewed Sectarian Debate

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Playwright Ismaël Saïdi speaks to a mostly-Muslim students at a school in the Brussels district of Laeken, where two suicide-bombers grew up. Teri Schultz for NPR hide caption

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Teri Schultz for NPR

In Tough Brussels District, School Urges Students To Fight Intolerance

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Policemen search passengers at the entrance of the De Brouckere metro station in Brussels on March 24, two days after the terrorist attack on the city. PHILIPPE HUGUEN/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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PHILIPPE HUGUEN/AFP/Getty Images

Investigation Continues As Brussels Recovers From Terror Attacks

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This image provided by the Belgian Federal Police shows a man at Belgium's Zaventem airport whom officials have identified as Ibrahim el Bakraoui. A Belgian prosecutor named him as a suspected suicide bomber in Tuesday's attack on the airport. AP hide caption

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A man wears the Belgian flag as people observe a minute of silence Wednesday at the Place de la Bourse, in honor of the victims of Tuesday's terrorist attacks in Brussels. Christopher Furlong/Getty Images hide caption

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Brussels Attacks, One Day After: What We Know

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Performing in his play Djihad, writer/director and lead actor Ismaël Saïdi plays a character lamenting his life in prison upon returning from fighting in Syria. Courtesy of @djihadcompany hide caption

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Courtesy of @djihadcompany

A Belgian Playwright Tackles Muslim Radicalization With Comedy

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A Belgian soldier patrols Brussels' Grand Place after police say they disrupted a plot to attack during New Year's Eve celebrations in Belgium. Francois Lenoir/Reuters /Landov hide caption

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Francois Lenoir/Reuters /Landov

Paris Prosecutor Francois Molins delivers a press conference Tuesday about the Nov. 13 attacks that claimed 130 lives in the French capital. Loic Venance/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Loic Venance/AFP/Getty Images