As more people turn to laser displays for holiday house decorations, aviation authorities warn not to shine them into the sky. TeleBrands hide caption

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TeleBrands

For Christmas Thrills Without The Spills, More Decorators Turn To Lasers

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A laser weapon system on the USS Ponce, which has been deployed to the Persian Gulf. The Navy released a video showing the system taking target practice. John F. Williams/U.S. Navy hide caption

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John F. Williams/U.S. Navy

Physicists put diamonds at the center of this massive laser, to see what would happen. Matt Swisher/Matt Swisher/LLNL hide caption

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Matt Swisher/Matt Swisher/LLNL

Physicists Crush Diamonds With Giant Laser

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The National Ignition Facility's 192 laser beams focus onto a tiny target. LLNL hide caption

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LLNL

Scientists Say Their Giant Laser Has Produced Nuclear Fusion

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This laser's just pretty, not powerful: Artist Yvette Mattern's laser rainbow in Whitley Bay, England, earlier this year. Bethany Clarke/Getty Images hide caption

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Bethany Clarke/Getty Images