The sun rises behind the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation telescopes at the National Science Foundation'€™s South Pole Station. Steffen Richter/Harvard University hide caption

itoggle caption Steffen Richter/Harvard University

Observing the multitude of galaxies in our own universe is a piece of cake. Observing the multiverse, if such a thing exists, seems impossible. Above, the Milky Way rises above the ESO's ALMA observatory in Chile. Y.Beletsky/ESO hide caption

itoggle caption Y.Beletsky/ESO

Your direct connection with the stars and all of the space in between them. iStockphoto.com hide caption

itoggle caption iStockphoto.com

A computer simulation of the formation of large-scale structures in the Universe, showing a patch of 100 million light-years and the resulting coherent motions of galaxies flowing towards the highest mass concentration in the centre. The snapshot refers to an epoch about 10 billion years back in time. Klaus Dolag/VIMOS-VLT Deep Survey/ESO hide caption

itoggle caption Klaus Dolag/VIMOS-VLT Deep Survey/ESO

An artist's impression of a gamma-ray burst, a powerful jet of energy lasting from less than a second to several minutes. The most powerful events in the universe, they are thought to be mostly associated with the explosion of stars that collapse into black holes. A. Roquette/ESO hide caption

itoggle caption A. Roquette/ESO