An example of a human precision grip — grasping a first metacarpal from the thumb of a specimen of Australopithecus africanus that's thought to be 2 to 3 million years old. T.L. Kivell & M. Skinner hide caption

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Maybe Early Humans Weren't The First To Get A Good Grip

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Tilda the orangutan, relaxing between gabfests at the Cologne Zoo. Cologne Zoo hide caption

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From The Mouths Of Apes, Babble Hints At Origins of Human Speech

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"I don't know if I'm the best at it, but I have a go." -Serkis on performance capture David James/Twentieth Century Fox hide caption

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Random Questions With: Andy Serkis

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An endangered Sumatran orangutan with a baby clings on tree branches in the forest of Bukit Lawang, part of the vast Leuser National Park, in Indonesia's Sumatra island. Romeo Gacad/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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