EVATAR is a book-size lab system that can replicate a woman's reproductive cycle. Each compartment contains living tissue from a different part of the reproductive tract. The blue fluid pumps through each compartment, chemically connecting the various tissues. Courtesy of Northwestern University hide caption

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Courtesy of Northwestern University

Device Mimicking Female Reproductive Cycle Could Aid Research

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Scientists have genetically engineered mice (but not this cute one) to be resistant to the addictive effects of cocaine. Getty Images hide caption

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Getty Images

A Brain Tweak Lets Mice Abstain From Cocaine

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The micromotor device may someday be used to deliver antibiotics to the stomach. Angewandte Chemie International Edition hide caption

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Angewandte Chemie International Edition

This Tiny Submarine Cruises Inside A Stomach To Deliver Drugs

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Some ethicists and consumer watchdog groups worry that the newly revised federal rules governing medical research don't go far enough to protect the rights and privacy of patients. Dana Neely/Getty Images hide caption

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Dana Neely/Getty Images

Research with living systems is never simple, scientists say, so there are many possible sources of variation in any experiment, ranging from the animals and cells to the details of lab technique. Tom Werner/Getty Images hide caption

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Tom Werner/Getty Images

What Does It Mean When Cancer Findings Can't Be Reproduced?

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Rep. Tim Murphy, R-Pa., embraces Rep. Fred Upton, R-Mich., during a media briefing about the 21st Century Cures Act on Capitol Hill on Nov. 30. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

In a cluster of glowing human stem cells, one cell divides. The cell membrane is shown in purple, while DNA in the dividing nucleus is blue. The white fibers linking the nucleus are spindles, which aid in cell division. Allen Institute for Cell Science hide caption

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Allen Institute for Cell Science
Katherine Streeter for NPR

Big Data Coming In Faster Than Biomedical Researchers Can Process It

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Hanna Barczyk for NPR

Patients Increasingly Influence The Direction Of Medical Research

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Gregoire Courtine, a neurologist at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, holds a silicone model of a primate's brain with an electrode array. The goal is to pick up signals from the brain and transmit them to the legs. Alain Herzog/EPFL hide caption

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Alain Herzog/EPFL

Monkeys Regain Control Of Paralyzed Legs With Help Of An Implant

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Cori Bargmann is applying her training as a neuroscientist to shaping the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative's ambitious agenda. Chan Zuckerberg Initiative hide caption

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Chan Zuckerberg Initiative

Applying A Silicon Valley Approach To Jump-Start Medical Research

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Roy Scott/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Reviews Of Medical Studies May Be Tainted By Funders' Influence

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Rats are great at remembering where they last sniffed the strawberries. Alexey Krasaven/Flickr hide caption

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Alexey Krasaven/Flickr

Rats That Reminisce May Lead To Better Tests For Alzheimer's Drugs

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A multi-million dollar effort to produce a test to guide treatment for a potentially lethal skin cancer recently fell apart after the scientific investigator discovered that the commercial antibodies he was using were unreliable. Cultura RM Exclusive/Peter Mulle/Getty Images hide caption

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Cultura RM Exclusive/Peter Mulle/Getty Images