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Scientists Are Not So Hot At Predicting Which Cancer Studies Will Succeed

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Kamni Vallabh helps her daughter Sonia get ready for her wedding, a few months before Kamni started showing symptoms of the prion disease that would kill her. Courtesy of Sonia Vallabh hide caption

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Courtesy of Sonia Vallabh

A Mother's Early Death Drives Her Daughter To Find A Treatment

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Fetuses in the third trimester responded more often to patterns that resembled faces than to patterns that did not. BSIP/UIG/Getty Images hide caption

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Fetuses Respond To Face-Like Patterns, Study Suggests

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Stories of outright misconduct are rare in science. But the pressures on researchers manifest in many more subtle ways, say social scientists studying the problem. Eva Bee/Getty Images hide caption

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Eva Bee/Getty Images

How A Budget Squeeze Can Lead To Sloppy Science And Even Cheating

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Drugs That Work In Mice Often Fail When Tried In People

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How Flawed Science Is Undermining Good Medicine

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EVATAR is a book-size lab system that can replicate a woman's reproductive cycle. Each compartment contains living tissue from a different part of the reproductive tract. The blue fluid pumps through each compartment, chemically connecting the various tissues. Courtesy of Northwestern University hide caption

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Courtesy of Northwestern University

Device Mimicking Female Reproductive Cycle Could Aid Research

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Scientists have genetically engineered mice (but not this cute one) to be resistant to the addictive effects of cocaine. Getty Images hide caption

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A Brain Tweak Lets Mice Abstain From Cocaine

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