Police tape blocks off a street where a 16-year-old was shot and killed and another 18-year-old was shot and wounded on the on April 25 in Chicago. Joshua Lott/Getty Images hide caption

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For Stopping A Pandemic Of Gun Violence, Let's Look To The Flu

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This year's flu vaccine protects against a few different virus strains, including the H1N1 seen here. The fuzzy outer layer is made of proteins that allow the virus to attach to human cells. NIAID/Flickr hide caption

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Inside Each Flu Shot, Months Of Virus Tracking And Predictions

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A blood test developed by Harvard researchers checks for evidence of past infection with more than a thousand strains of virus, from about 200 virus families. The swine flu virus shown here, A/CA/4/09, rarely infects humans. C. S. Goldsmith/CDC hide caption

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How Many Viruses Have Infected You?

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Which flu vaccine should you get? That may depend on your age and your general health. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Flu Season Brings Stronger Vaccines And Revised Advice

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Google's Flu Tracker Suffers From Sniffles

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Influenza covers it's shell with two types of accessories: the H spike, blue, and the N spike, red. Here the flu particle is sliced open to show its genetic material. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases hide caption

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Kimberly Delp gives a flu shot to Carleen Matthews at the Homewood Senior Center in Pittsburgh, Pa., last September. Andrew Rush/AP hide caption

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Sonia Despiar, right, a nurse with Gouverneur Healthcare Services, injects Imelda Silva with flu vaccine on Friday, Jan. 11, 2013, in New York. At least 10 elderly people and two children in New York have died from the flu and hospitalizations are climbing as the illness hits every county in the state. Bebeto Matthews/AP hide caption

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When flu viruses (in red) accumulate an escape protein too quickly, they exit the cell nucleus (in blue) before they've made enough viral copies to spread the infection. Benjamin tenOever hide caption

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