On one Alaskan island, reindeer have eaten the lichen faster than it could regrow. They're now digging up roots and grazing on grass. Courtesy of Paul Melovidov hide caption

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Courtesy of Paul Melovidov

When Their Food Ran Out, These Reindeer Kept Digging

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Officials from the Norwegian Nature Inspectorate discovered hundreds of dead reindeer on a mountain plateau after a lightning storm. Havard Kjontvedt/Norwegian Nature Inspectorate hide caption

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Havard Kjontvedt/Norwegian Nature Inspectorate

A family near the Siberian city of Salekhard. A heat wave is blamed for thawing a 75-year-old reindeer carcass, along with dormant spores of anthrax bacteria that infected it. Sergey Anisimov/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Sergey Anisimov/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

Anthrax Outbreak In Russia Thought To Be Result Of Thawing Permafrost

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For This Reindeer, The Game Is Hide And Seek

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