Ovarian tissue after the thaw — ready for reimplantation. Courtesy of The Infertility Center of St. Louis hide caption

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Courtesy of The Infertility Center of St. Louis

Twin Sisters Try To Get Pregnant With Ovaries They Froze In 2009

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Molecular markers show structures and cell types within a human embryo, shown here 12 days after fertilization. The epiblast, for example, appears in green. Gist Croft, Alessia Deglincerti, and Ali H. Brivanlou/The Rockefeller University hide caption

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Gist Croft, Alessia Deglincerti, and Ali H. Brivanlou/The Rockefeller University

Advance In Human Embryo Research Rekindles Ethical Debate

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Maria Fabrizio for NPR

Women Find A Fertility Test Isn't As Reliable As They'd Like

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Eggs may be more vulnerable to freezing than embryos, but that's just one factor that affects the odds of having a baby with frozen eggs. Jean-Paul Chassenet/Science Source hide caption

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Jean-Paul Chassenet/Science Source

In the technique known as intracytoplasmic sperm injection, a fertility specialist uses a tiny needle to inject sperm into an egg cell. Mauro Fermariello/Science Source hide caption

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Mauro Fermariello/Science Source

Along with sperm, the in vitro procedure adds fresh mitochondria extracted from less mature cells in the same woman's ovaries. The hope is to revitalize older eggs with these extra "batteries." But the FDA still wants proof that the technique works and is safe. Chris Nickels for NPR hide caption

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Chris Nickels for NPR

Fertility Clinic Courts Controversy With Treatment That Recharges Eggs

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A healthy baby still tops women's wishes for their future children, but intelligence and athletic skill are gaining importance. Claire Fraser/ImageZoo/Corbis hide caption

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Claire Fraser/ImageZoo/Corbis

A technician opens a vessel containing women's frozen egg cells in April 2011 in Amsterdam. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/Getty Images

Silicon Valley Companies Add New Benefit For Women: Egg-Freezing

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Sperm are placed inside the egg with a needle during a fertility treatment called intracytoplasmic sperm injection. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Tina Nevill of Essex, England, holds Poppy, who was conceived by in vitro fertilization. The U.K.'s health system records all IVF cycles performed in the country. Barcroft Media/Landov hide caption

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Barcroft Media/Landov

Doctors use tissue slides like this one of the ovary's outer cortex to confirm a woman's ovarian reserve. It's also the the ovary tissue that's removed in an ovarian transplant. Courtesy of the Infertility Center of St. Louis hide caption

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Courtesy of the Infertility Center of St. Louis

Chance To Pause Biological Clock With Ovarian Transplant Stirs Debate

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Human embryos under a microscope at an IVF clinic in La Jolla, Calif. Sandy Huffaker/Getty Images hide caption

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Sandy Huffaker/Getty Images

Freezing Eggs To Make Babies Later Moves Toward Mainstream

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