A scientist holds a bioprosthetic mouse ovary made of gelatin with tweezers. Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine hide caption

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Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine

Scientists One Step Closer To 3-D-Printed Ovaries To Treat Infertility

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Mitochondrial diseases can be passed from mothers to their children in DNA. JGI/Tom Grill/Getty Images/Blend Images hide caption

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JGI/Tom Grill/Getty Images/Blend Images

Scientists have developed a smartphone app to measure sperm count at home. Hadi Shafiee/Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School hide caption

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Hadi Shafiee/Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School

The genes in mitochondria, which are the powerhouses in human cells, can cause fatal inherited disease. But replacing the bad genes may cause other health problems. Getty Images/Science Photo Library hide caption

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Getty Images/Science Photo Library

Janet (left) and Jackie Carter's wedding in August 2015. They set up a crowdfunding site to help defray the considerable costs of IVF. Courtesy of Brian Fancher Photography hide caption

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Courtesy of Brian Fancher Photography

Please, Baby, Please: Some Couples Turn To Crowdfunding For IVF

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Ovarian tissue after the thaw — ready for reimplantation. Courtesy of The Infertility Center of St. Louis hide caption

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Courtesy of The Infertility Center of St. Louis

Twin Sisters Try To Get Pregnant With Ovaries They Froze In 2009

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Molecular markers show structures and cell types within a human embryo, shown here 12 days after fertilization. The epiblast, for example, appears in green. Gist Croft, Alessia Deglincerti, and Ali H. Brivanlou/The Rockefeller University hide caption

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Gist Croft, Alessia Deglincerti, and Ali H. Brivanlou/The Rockefeller University

Advance In Human Embryo Research Rekindles Ethical Debate

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Maria Fabrizio for NPR

Women Find A Fertility Test Isn't As Reliable As They'd Like

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Eggs may be more vulnerable to freezing than embryos, but that's just one factor that affects the odds of having a baby with frozen eggs. Jean-Paul Chassenet/Science Source hide caption

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Jean-Paul Chassenet/Science Source

In the technique known as intracytoplasmic sperm injection, a fertility specialist uses a tiny needle to inject sperm into an egg cell. Mauro Fermariello/Science Source hide caption

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Mauro Fermariello/Science Source

Along with sperm, the in vitro procedure adds fresh mitochondria extracted from less mature cells in the same woman's ovaries. The hope is to revitalize older eggs with these extra "batteries." But the FDA still wants proof that the technique works and is safe. Chris Nickels for NPR hide caption

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Chris Nickels for NPR

Fertility Clinic Courts Controversy With Treatment That Recharges Eggs

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A healthy baby still tops women's wishes for their future children, but intelligence and athletic skill are gaining importance. Claire Fraser/ImageZoo/Corbis hide caption

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Claire Fraser/ImageZoo/Corbis

A technician opens a vessel containing women's frozen egg cells in April 2011 in Amsterdam. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/Getty Images

Silicon Valley Companies Add New Benefit For Women: Egg-Freezing

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