A mountain yellow-legged frog returns to the wild in the Desolation Wilderness, south of Lake Tahoe in California. Josh Cassidy/KQED hide caption

toggle caption
Josh Cassidy/KQED

In The Battle To Save Frogs, Scientists Fight Fungus With Fungus

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/493296149/493399856" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Mustafa Alnour Alhassan, 26, lost his leg to a flesh-eating fungal disease called mycetoma. Here, he sits beside his father, Alnour Alhassan, at the Mycetoma Research Center in Khartoum, the capital of Sudan. Neil Brandvold hide caption

toggle caption
Neil Brandvold

N. gardneri mushrooms grow at the base of young babassu palms in Brazil. A bland tan by day, the fungi emit an eerie green light by night. Michele P. Verderane/IP-USP hide caption

toggle caption
Michele P. Verderane/IP-USP

Why Some Mushrooms Glow In The Dark

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/394089178/394438291" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Histoplasma capsulatum is common in soil in the Midwest and Mid-Atlantic. So how did it get a rancher in Montana sick? CDC hide caption

toggle caption
CDC

Fungi (cyan) surround a human hair within the skin. A study in the journal Nature shows the population of fungi on human skin is more diverse that previously thought. Alex Valm, Ph.D. hide caption

toggle caption
Alex Valm, Ph.D.

Research Reveals Yeasty Beasts Living On Our Skin

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/185821644/186027941" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript