Laura Rees (left) and her sister Nancy Fee sit with their father, Joseph Fee, while holding a photo of his late wife, Elizabeth. Robert Durell for KHN hide caption

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Robert Durell for KHN

Rule Change Could Push Hospitals To Tell Patients About Nursing Home Quality

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Dr. Abraham Nussbaum argues for medicine to reconnect with its past: Caring for patients should be a calling, not a job, he says. PhotoAlto/Michele Constantini/Getty Images hide caption

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PhotoAlto/Michele Constantini/Getty Images

Medical errors rank behind heart disease and cancer as the third leading cause of death in the U.S., Johns Hopkins researchers say. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Hear Rachel Martin talk with Dr. Martin Makary

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Members of Congress complained to the administration that hospitals needed more time to check the accuracy of quality ratings. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

After knee surgery, David Larson, 66, of Huntington Beach, Calif., experienced pain in a calf muscle. His answer to an automated email from the doctor led to the diagnosis and treatment of a potentially dangerous blood clot. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News

Errors in diagnosis, such as inaccuracies or delays in making the information available, account for an estimated 10 percent of patient deaths, a blue-ribbon report says. iStockphoto hide caption

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Nursing attendant Tracie Bell helps manage patients at the ophthalmology clinic at Los Angeles County Harbor-UCLA Medical Center. The clinic created a color-coded system to reduce wait times for patients. Anna Gorman/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Anna Gorman/Kaiser Health News

PCORI Executive Director Joe Selby says grants to medical societies are needed to get through to busy professionals who "may not answer our phone calls." Stephen Elliot/Courtesy of PCORI hide caption

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Stephen Elliot/Courtesy of PCORI

Coordinating care for high-risk patients was expected to save money and improve quality of care. A Medicare experiment didn't pan out. Roy Scott/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Roy Scott/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Patient perceptions have been tough to change at Rowan Regional Medical Center in Salisbury, N.C. Joanna Serah/Wikimedia hide caption

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Joanna Serah/Wikimedia

With Medicare Pay On The Line, Hospitals Push Harder To Please Patients

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