Microwave popcorn containing trans fats from November 2013. The Grocery Manufacturers Association says the industry has lowered the amount of trans fat added to food products by more than 86 percent. But trans fats can still be found in some processed food items. Shannon Stapleton/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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FDA To Food Companies: This Time, Zero Means Zero Trans Fats

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Various food items that contained trans fats in November 2013. That month, the Food and Drug Administration first announced plans to ban partially hydrogenated vegetable oils from all food products. A final rule is expected any day now. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Adios, Trans Fats: FDA Poised To Phase Out Artery-Clogging Fat

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Last year, Long John Silver's Big Catch platter — which contained a whopping 33 grams of trans fats — won the dubious distinction of "worst restaurant meal in America" from a health watchdog group. Now, the fast-food chain says it has ditched the unhealthful fats from its menu. Tom Spaulding/Flickr hide caption

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A vending cart with breakfast foods in New York City. In 2008, the city expanded its trans-fat ban from spreads and frying oils to baked goods, frozen foods, and doughnuts. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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