The new Apple iPhone 7 lacks a separate headphone jack, which makes people wonder how they can charge the phone while listening to music through a wired headphone via the Lightning connector. Apple's answer: a separate dock that starts at $39. Stephen Lam/Getty Images hide caption

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Apple CEO Tim Cook discusses the company's new wireless AirPods headphones during an event in San Francisco on Wednesday in which Apple also presented the iPhone 7. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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An exhibitor shows a smart rice cooker to a visitor at a display booth for MiJia, a new brand by Xiaomi at the 2016 Global Mobile Internet Conference in Beijing on April 28. Andy Wong/AP hide caption

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Losing Steam In Smartphones, Chinese Firm Turns To Smart Rice Cookers

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A customer tries the Siri voice recognition function on an Apple iPhone 6 Plus in Hong Kong. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Voice Recognition Software Finally Beats Humans At Typing, Study Finds

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At This English Bar, An Old-School Solution To Rude Cellphones

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Managing Your News Intake In The Age Of Endless Phone Notifications

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Phone, Everlasting: What If Your Smartphone Never Got Old?

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Smartphone assistants like Siri will give you a national help line to call when you bring up suicide. But they have trouble recognizing other things, like rape or physical abuse. Michael Nagle/Getty Images hide caption

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A visitor takes photos with her smartphone outside the Supreme Court in 2014, while the judges heard arguments related to warrantless cellphone searches by police. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

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Both Google and Samsung are rolling out new processes to issue security updates for Android devices, like the Samsung Galaxy S6 and S6 Edge. Jung Yeon-Je/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Under Pressure, Google Promises To Update Android Security Regularly

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A security gap on Android, the most popular smartphone operating system, was discovered by security experts in a lab and is so far not widely exploited. iStockphoto hide caption

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Major Flaw In Android Phones Would Let Hackers In With Just A Text

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Google's upcoming "now on tap" feature will let smartphone users ask a question within an app like Spotify. Google Inside Search hide caption

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How Personal Should A Personal Assistant Get? Google And Apple Disagree

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A woman on a street in Seoul checks her cellphone. The government is ramping up efforts to control an outbreak of the Middle East respiratory syndrome by monitoring the smartphones of those under quarantine. Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Creepy Or Comforting? South Korea Tracks Smartphones To Curb MERS

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The Hidden FM Radio Inside Your Pocket, And Why You Can't Use It

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The sun sets as a visitor uses his mobile phone Monday during the opening day of the 2015 Mobile World Congress in Barcelona. Wall Street Journal reporter Ryan Knutson — interviewed from the conference Monday via Skype by NPR's Robert Siegel — says that for some smartphone users, Wi-Fi may be able to replace most of the functionality of a cellphone carrier. Josep Lago/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Wi-Fi Everywhere May Let You Roam Free From Your Mobile Carrier

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Students use tablets in a classroom in Mae Chan, a remote town in Thailand's northern province. Christophe Archambault/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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The 50 Most Effective Ways To Transform The Developing World

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Illustration by John Hersey/Courtesy of WNYC

Pick Up Your Smartphone Less Often. You Might Think Better.

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