Both Google and Samsung are rolling out new processes to issue security updates for Android devices, like the Samsung Galaxy S6 and S6 Edge. Jung Yeon-Je/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Under Pressure, Google Promises To Update Android Security Regularly
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A security gap on Android, the most popular smartphone operating system, was discovered by security experts in a lab and is so far not widely exploited. iStockphoto hide caption

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Major Flaw In Android Phones Would Let Hackers In With Just A Text
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Google's upcoming "now on tap" feature will let smartphone users ask a question within an app like Spotify. Google Inside Search hide caption

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How Personal Should A Personal Assistant Get? Google And Apple Disagree
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A woman on a street in Seoul checks her cellphone. The government is ramping up efforts to control an outbreak of the Middle East respiratory syndrome by monitoring the smartphones of those under quarantine. Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Creepy Or Comforting? South Korea Tracks Smartphones To Curb MERS
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The Hidden FM Radio Inside Your Pocket, And Why You Can't Use It
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The sun sets as a visitor uses his mobile phone Monday during the opening day of the 2015 Mobile World Congress in Barcelona. Wall Street Journal reporter Ryan Knutson — interviewed from the conference Monday via Skype by NPR's Robert Siegel — says that for some smartphone users, Wi-Fi may be able to replace most of the functionality of a cellphone carrier. Josep Lago/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Wi-Fi Everywhere May Let You Roam Free From Your Mobile Carrier
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Students use tablets in a classroom in Mae Chan, a remote town in Thailand's northern province. Christophe Archambault/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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The 50 Most Effective Ways To Transform The Developing World
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Illustration by John Hersey/Courtesy of WNYC
Pick Up Your Smartphone Less Often. You Might Think Better.
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Illustration by John Hersey/Courtesy of WNYC
Bored ... And Brilliant? A Challenge To Disconnect From Your Phone
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Irene Chen and Longlai Zuo, with the China-based company Quality Technology Industrial, show off their top-line phones, which cost about $100. Aarti Shahani/NPR hide caption

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When It Comes To Smartphones, Are Americans Dumb?
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The Interview starring James Franco and Seth Rogen opened in 331 mostly independent theaters and on streaming sites Christmas Day. It's estimated to rake in $4 million in its opening weekend. Marcus Ingram/Getty Images hide caption

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Startup Better Finance is offering lease-to-own programs for high-end smartphones. But some customers say that retail stores, such as MetroPCS, aren't always clear about the lease terms up front. Larry W. Smith/EPA/Landov hide caption

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What You Need To Know About Subprime Lending For Smartphones
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Science says she really doesn't it like it when you do that. LouLou & Tummie/ImageZoo/Corbis hide caption

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Want To Perk Up Your Love Life? Put Away That Smartphone
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The Samsung Galaxy Mega (from left), Samsung Galaxy S4 and Apple iPhone 5 are shown. Apple is expected to announce larger models of its smartphone on Tuesday. Richard Drew/AP hide caption

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Size Matters: Why Apple Is Expected To Unveil A Bigger iPhone
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