This emergency alert jolted New Yorkers on Sept. 19 as police sought a suspect in connection with explosions in the New York City metropolitan area. Lacking a photo or a link to one, it raised concerns about racial profiling. AP hide caption

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AP

Samsung's Galaxy Note 7 is demonstrated in New York on July 28. All owners of the new smartphone have been urged to exchange the device after reports of phones' exploding or catching fire. Richard Drew/AP hide caption

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Richard Drew/AP

The new Apple iPhone 7 lacks a separate headphone jack, which makes people wonder how they can charge the phone while listening to music through a wired headphone via the Lightning connector. Apple's answer: a separate dock that starts at $39. Stephen Lam/Getty Images hide caption

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Stephen Lam/Getty Images

Apple CEO Tim Cook discusses the company's new wireless AirPods headphones during an event in San Francisco on Wednesday in which Apple also presented the iPhone 7. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg via Getty Images

An exhibitor shows a smart rice cooker to a visitor at a display booth for MiJia, a new brand by Xiaomi at the 2016 Global Mobile Internet Conference in Beijing on April 28. Andy Wong/AP hide caption

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Andy Wong/AP

Losing Steam In Smartphones, Chinese Firm Turns To Smart Rice Cookers

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A customer tries the Siri voice recognition function on an Apple iPhone 6 Plus in Hong Kong. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Voice Recognition Software Finally Beats Humans At Typing, Study Finds

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At This English Bar, An Old-School Solution To Rude Cellphones

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Oliver Byunggyu Woo/Getty Images/EyeEm Premium

Managing Your News Intake In The Age Of Endless Phone Notifications

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Ariel Zambelich/NPR

Phone, Everlasting: What If Your Smartphone Never Got Old?

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Smartphone assistants like Siri will give you a national help line to call when you bring up suicide. But they have trouble recognizing other things, like rape or physical abuse. Michael Nagle/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Nagle/Getty Images

A visitor takes photos with her smartphone outside the Supreme Court in 2014, while the judges heard arguments related to warrantless cellphone searches by police. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

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Jose Luis Magana/AP