Henok launches off a homemade quarterpipe ramp at a parking lot. Sean Stromsoe hide caption

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Sean Stromsoe

How Do You Say 'Gnarly' In Amharic? Ethiopia Gets Its First Skate Park

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Ethiopian Prime Minister Hailemariam Desalegn (left), walks alongside President Obama during the U.S. president's visit to the African nation last July. Critics say Ethiopia has cracked down hard on the opposition, but makes modest gestures to give the impression it tolerates some dissent. SIMON MAINA/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ethiopia Stifles Dissent, While Giving Impression Of Tolerance, Critics Say

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At a 2015 press conference with President Obama in Addis Ababa, Ethiopian Prime Minister Hailemariam Desalegn asked the foreign press corps to "help our journalists to increase their capacity." Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Freed From Prison, Ethiopian Bloggers Still Can't Leave The Country

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A farmer in Ethiopia, in the grips of its worst drought in decades. Thomas Imo/Photothek via Getty Images hide caption

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Thomas Imo/Photothek via Getty Images

What Happens When A Disaster Unfolds In Slow Motion

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President Obama and his delegation stand Monday during a welcome ceremony with Ethiopia's Prime Minister Hailemariam Desalegn at the National Palace in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Tiksa Negeri /Reuters /Landov hide caption

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Tiksa Negeri /Reuters /Landov

A man in Nairobi, Kenya, stands in front of a mural of President Obama, created by the Kenyan graffiti artist Bankslave, ahead of Obama's trip to Kenya and Ethiopia. Ben Curtis/AP hide caption

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Ben Curtis/AP

Jewish worshippers gather at a makeshift synagogue established by the Jewish Agency for Israel for Ethiopian Jews in Gondar, Ethiopia, in 2012. Jenny Vaughan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jenny Vaughan/AFP/Getty Images

They Speak Hebrew And Keep Kosher: The Left-Behind Ethiopian Jews

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The Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam is under construction near Assosa, Ethiopia. When it's completed, the dam will have be able to produce 6,000 megawatts of electricity, making it the biggest hydroelectric power station in Africa. Elias Asmare/AP hide caption

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Elias Asmare/AP

Don't Torpedo The Dam, Full Speed Ahead For Ethiopia's Nile Project

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Inside Chef Chane's tiny kitchen. Every few months or years, his landlord — taking note of Chane's popularity — will raise the rent, or a conniving official will demand a bribe. Then, instead of bowing to the system, Chane will disappear and set up in a new location. Gregory Warner/NPR hide caption

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Gregory Warner/NPR

Meet Chef Chane, Ethiopia's Version Of The Infamous 'Soup Nazi'

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Thousands of Ethiopian opposition activists demonstrate in Addis Ababa on June 2, 2013. The demonstrations were organized by the newly formed Blue Party opposition group. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ethiopia's Blue Party Tries To Reacquaint Nation With Dissent

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Abebe, the owner of Abyssinia, a popular Ethiopian eatery in Nairobi, Kenya, shows some of the foods permitted during the pre-Christmas fast. Orthodox Ethiopians typically eat just one vegan meal per day for 40 days before the Christmas feast on Jan. 7. Gregory Warner/NPR hide caption

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A 40-Day Vegan Fast, Then, At Last, A January Christmas Feast

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