Police officers secure the perimeter at the scene of a garbage landslide, as excavators aid rescue efforts on the outskirts of Ethiopia's capital city, Addis Ababa, on Sunday. Elias Meseret/AP hide caption

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Elias Meseret/AP

In a scene from Sunday, Oct. 2, festival-goers chant slogans against the government during a march in Bishoftu, Ethiopia. A week of violence prompted the country to declare a state of emergency. AP hide caption

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AP

Protesters chant slogans at a demonstration in Ethiopia's capital, Addis Ababa, on Aug. 6. Demonstrations took place last weekend across the country, and Amnesty International says dozens of peaceful protesters were shot dead. Tiksa Negeri/Reuters hide caption

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Tiksa Negeri/Reuters

Ethiopia Grapples With The Aftermath Of A Deadly Weekend

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Henok launches off a homemade quarterpipe ramp at a parking lot. Sean Stromsoe hide caption

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Sean Stromsoe

How Do You Say 'Gnarly' In Amharic? Ethiopia Gets Its First Skate Park

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Ethiopian Prime Minister Hailemariam Desalegn (left), walks alongside President Obama during the U.S. president's visit to the African nation last July. Critics say Ethiopia has cracked down hard on the opposition, but makes modest gestures to give the impression it tolerates some dissent. SIMON MAINA/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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SIMON MAINA/AFP/Getty Images

Ethiopia Stifles Dissent, While Giving Impression Of Tolerance, Critics Say

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At a 2015 press conference with President Obama in Addis Ababa, Ethiopian Prime Minister Hailemariam Desalegn asked the foreign press corps to "help our journalists to increase their capacity." Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Freed From Prison, Ethiopian Bloggers Still Can't Leave The Country

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A farmer in Ethiopia, in the grips of its worst drought in decades. Thomas Imo/Photothek via Getty Images hide caption

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Thomas Imo/Photothek via Getty Images

What Happens When A Disaster Unfolds In Slow Motion

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President Obama and his delegation stand Monday during a welcome ceremony with Ethiopia's Prime Minister Hailemariam Desalegn at the National Palace in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Tiksa Negeri /Reuters /Landov hide caption

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Tiksa Negeri /Reuters /Landov