A mock-up of a warning label for sodas and sugary drinks proposed in California by public health advocates. California Center for Public Health Advocacy hide caption

itoggle caption California Center for Public Health Advocacy

Beginning April 1, all sugary beverages and food of "minimal-to-no nutritional value" sold on the Navajo reservation will incur an additional 2-cent tax. April Sorrow/Flickr hide caption

itoggle caption April Sorrow/Flickr

Berkeley's efforts to pass a penny-per-ounce tax on sugary drinks faced opposition with deep pockets — but it also got sizable cash infusions from some big-name donors. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

The majority of voters in San Francisco and Berkeley, Calif., voted in favor of a soda tax, but the measure didn't gain the required two-thirds majority required in San Francisco. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Proponents of the taxes say that if the measures pass, the money would be directed, in San Francisco, toward childhood nutrition and recreation and, in Berkeley, into the city's general fund. Joel Saget /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Joel Saget /AFP/Getty Images

A mock-up of a warning label for sodas and sugary drinks proposed in California by public health advocates. California Center for Public Health Advocacy hide caption

itoggle caption California Center for Public Health Advocacy

A Coca-Cola mural in Vicksburg, Miss., where the soda was first bottled in 1894. Mississippi's governor is expected to sign a bill that would prevent the regulation of soda portion sizes by counties or towns. pratt/via Flickr hide caption

itoggle caption pratt/via Flickr

A sign protesting a beverage tax in Richmond, Calif. The U.S. soft drink industry has fought proposals that would put a tax on sugar sweetened beverages like sodas and energy drinks. Braden Reddall/Reuters /Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Braden Reddall/Reuters /Landov

Researchers say that if the price of soda gets higher, people will drink less of it, which will lead to fewer deaths. Joel Saget/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Joel Saget/AFP/Getty Images