Patient reviews of doctors tend to focus on non-medical issues like wait time, billing and front office staff. Mahafreen H. Mistry/NPR hide caption

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On Yelp, Doctors Get Reviewed Like Restaurants — And It Rankles
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An architectural rendering of the Cleveland Clinic's planned cancer center. Courtesy of the Cleveland Clinic hide caption

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Cancer Spawns A Construction Boom In Cleveland
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Are You Sick, And Sick Of Hearing 'Everything Happens For A Reason'?
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Chris Newman, seen at her home in Los Molinos, Calif., calls the change she helped get made to lung cancer treatment guidelines a "small, but very important victory." Courtesy of Chris Newman hide caption

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Life online is all about sharing images. Being able to share medical images would make health care a lot easier, patients say. Science Photo Library/Corbis hide caption

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When Patients Read What Their Doctors Write
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When weighing the risk of heart disease, how the numbers are presented to patients can make all the difference. iStockphoto hide caption

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For Better Treatment, Doctors And Patients Share The Decisions
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Miss Idaho Sierra Sandison, shown here in her home town of Twin Falls, Idaho, decided not to hide the insulin pump she wears to treat Type 1 diabetes during the pageant. Photo illustration by Drew Nash/Courtesy of Times News hide caption

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