Helmeted Chadian and other African police commandos, armed with dummy rifles hunt down terrorist suspects who've taken hostages in the building, during a US military led Flintlock 2017 law enforcement exercise in Ndjamena Chad, 15 March 2017. Ofeibea Quist-Arcton/NPR hide caption

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People gather at the site of a suicide bomb attack at a market in June 2015 in Maiduguri, Nigeria, where two girls blew themselves up near a crowded mosque. Jossy Ola/AP hide caption

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This camp near Maiduguri, Borno State, in northeastern Nigeria houses more than 16,000 displaced persons. Stefan Heunis /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Protesters outside the Nigerian High Commission in London hold up placards demanding help from the Nigerian government to find missing girls a year after their kidnapping by Islamic extremists in April 2014. Alastair Grant/AP hide caption

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Displaced women at the Muna informal settlement outside Maiduguri. They're among more than 2 million people driven from their homes by Boko Haram attacks during northeastern Nigeria's 7-year insurgency. Ofeibea Quist Arcton/NPR hide caption

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People inspect a damaged mosque following an October 2015 explosion in Maiduguri, Nigeria. Maiduguri is in Borno State, where Boko Haram was born. Jossy Ola/AP hide caption

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Flimsy straw shelters at the Assaga refugee camp house Nigerians and displaced people within Niger who have fled from Boko Haram raids. They say they are hungry and need more food aid. Ofeibea Quist-Arcton/NPR hide caption

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Why Niger Is Having A Horrible Year

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Nigerian president Muhammadu Buhari speaks with freed Chibok schoolgirl Amina Ali Nkeki, who is carrying her baby, as Borno state governor Kashim Shettima (C) looks on in Abuja, on May 19, 2016. Stringer/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nigerian President Offers Support After First Of 219 Missing Schoolgirls Rescued

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