Boko Haram Boko Haram

Salamatu Umar, who was forced to marry a Boko Haram fighter, holds son Usman Abubakar. Jide Adeniyi-Jones for NPR hide caption

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Jide Adeniyi-Jones for NPR

The Lament Of The Boko Haram 'Brides'

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Modu Churi, who fled his village to escape the militant Boko Haram group last year, now earns a living by charging cellphones for displaced persons in northeastern Nigeria. Jide Adeniyi-Jones for NPR hide caption

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Jide Adeniyi-Jones for NPR

How To Succeed In Business After Fleeing For Your Life

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This young boy was kidnapped by Boko Haram. He managed to escape, spent months in a government barracks and now lives in a rehabilitation center. He is probably around 6 years old but doesn't know for sure. Jide Adeniyi-Jones for NPR hide caption

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Jide Adeniyi-Jones for NPR

The Little Boy Who Escaped From Boko Haram

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Uwani Musa Dure, 25, is one of the scores of mostly women and children who fled Gwoza and have recently returned. She now lives at a settlement for the displaced — and is searching for family members abducted by Boko Haram. Fati Abubakar/UNICEF hide caption

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Fati Abubakar/UNICEF

What It's Like To Come Home After Fleeing From Boko Haram

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Aweofeso Adebola (in white shirt) and Ifeoluwa Ayomide (in cap) pose with some of their students. Zachariah Ibrahim, who dreams of being a pilot, stands behind the girl in the green hijab. Fatima Alidarunge, who wants to be a soldier to fight Boko Haram, is in the blue headgear. Linus Unah for NPR hide caption

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Linus Unah for NPR

Five-year-old Fatima shows off her Sallah gift in a camp for those internally displaced by the ongoing violence in Maiduguri, the capital of Borno State in northeast Nigeria. Jide Adeniyi-Jones for NPR hide caption

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Jide Adeniyi-Jones for NPR

In Northeast Nigeria, Displaced Families Celebrate Ramadan's End In Style

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The recently released Chibok girls reunited with their families amidst laughter and tears in the Nigerian capital of Abuja. Still, 113 girls are being held by Boko Haram militants. Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

Helmeted Chadian and other African police commandos, armed with dummy rifles hunt down terrorist suspects who've taken hostages in the building, during a US military led Flintlock 2017 law enforcement exercise in Ndjamena Chad, 15 March 2017. Ofeibea Quist-Arcton/NPR hide caption

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People gather at the site of a suicide bomb attack at a market in June 2015 in Maiduguri, Nigeria, where two girls blew themselves up near a crowded mosque. Jossy Ola/AP hide caption

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Jossy Ola/AP