A right wing activist holds a sign during a rally at Martin Luther King Jr. Civic Center Park on April 27, 2017 in Berkeley, California. Protestors are gathering in Berkeley to protest the cancellation of a speech by American conservative political commentator Ann Coulter at UC Berkeley. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Carryn Owens, the widow of Navy SEAL William "Ryan" Owens, fought back tears as President Trump addressed her during his speech to a joint session of Congress Tuesday. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

President Trump's address to a joint session of Congress on Tuesday night is expected to strike a more optimistic tone than his inaugural address did last month. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Alex Wong/Getty Images

Monkeys' vocal equipment can produce the sounds of human speech, research shows, but they lack the connections between the auditory and motor parts of the brain that humans rely on to imitate words. Brian Jefferey Beggerly/Flickr hide caption

toggle caption
Brian Jefferey Beggerly/Flickr

Say, What? Monkey Mouths And Throats Are Equipped For Speech

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/504890630/505079200" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Tilda the orangutan, relaxing between gabfests at the Cologne Zoo. Cologne Zoo hide caption

toggle caption
Cologne Zoo

From The Mouths Of Apes, Babble Hints At Origins of Human Speech

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/377191887/377385895" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Katherine Streeter for NPR

Researchers Watch As Our Brains Turn Sounds Into Words

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/268432705/268964646" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Language may have evolved in concert with tool making. Sergey Lavrentev/iStockphoto.com hide caption

toggle caption
Sergey Lavrentev/iStockphoto.com