Diseased brain tissue from an Alzheimer's patient showing amyloid plaques (in blue) located in the gray matter of the brain. Dr Cecil H Fox/Science Source/Getty Images hide caption

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Rosemary Navarro, 40, looks through old childhood photographs at her home in La Habra, Calif. Her mother, Rosa Maria Navarro, passed away in 2009 from Alzheimer's. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News

Education may help brains cope with cognitive decline, and treatments for high blood pressure and other health problems may decrease dementia risk. Alfred Pasieka/Science Photo Library/Getty Images hide caption

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Alfred Pasieka/Science Photo Library/Getty Images

Dementia Risk Declines, And Education May Be One Reason Why

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This image is from lab-grown brain tissue — a minibrain — infected by Zika virus (white) with neural stem cells in red and neuronal nuclei in green. Courtesy of Xuyu Qian and Guo-li Ming hide caption

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Courtesy of Xuyu Qian and Guo-li Ming

'Minibrains' Could Help Drug Discovery For Zika And For Alzheimer's

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When in a playful mood, rats like a gentle tickle as much as the next guy, researchers find. Shimpei Ishiyama and Michael Brecht/Science hide caption

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Shimpei Ishiyama and Michael Brecht/Science

Gregoire Courtine, a neurologist at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, holds a silicone model of a primate's brain with an electrode array. The goal is to pick up signals from the brain and transmit them to the legs. Alain Herzog/EPFL hide caption

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Alain Herzog/EPFL

Monkeys Regain Control Of Paralyzed Legs With Help Of An Implant

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Robert Gaunt tests Nathan Copeland's ability to detect touch by tapping fingers on a robotic hand. UPMC/Pitt Health Sciences hide caption

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UPMC/Pitt Health Sciences

Brain Implant Restores Sense Of Touch To Paralyzed Man

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Sure, keeping a teenager's thoughts corralled may seem like lion taming. But that impulsivity may help them learn, too. Luciano Lozano/Getty Images hide caption

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Luciano Lozano/Getty Images
Katherine Streeter for NPR

Brain Game Claims Fail A Big Scientific Test

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Stuart Kinlough/Getty Images/Ikon Images

When Blind People Do Algebra, The Brain's Visual Areas Light Up

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Experimental drugs that clear clumps of proteins from the brains of Alzheimer's patients haven't panned out yet. Science Photo Library/Pasieka/Getty Images hide caption

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Science Photo Library/Pasieka/Getty Images

Test Of Experimental Alzheimer's Drug Finds Progress Against Brain Plaques

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What did she say? Eniko Kubinyi/Science hide caption

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Eniko Kubinyi/Science

Their Masters' Voices: Dogs Understand Tone And Meaning Of Words

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Lucky laboratory mice got to watch scenes from Orson Welles' classic Touch of Evil, starring Janet Leigh and Charlton Heston. Keystone/Getty Images hide caption

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Keystone/Getty Images

A Mouse Watches Film Noir And Offers Clues To Human Consciousness

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Jess Thom (left) and Jess Mabel Jones from Thom's show, Backstage in Biscuit Land. Thom's website says she's "changing the world, one tic at a time." James Lyndsay/Courtesy of Supporting Wall hide caption

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James Lyndsay/Courtesy of Supporting Wall
Katherine Du/NPR

Kit Parker's Story Part I

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Angelica Pereira feeds her daughter Luiza, who was born with microcephaly, at her mother's house in Santa Cruz do Capibaribe, Brazil. Felipe Dana/AP hide caption

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Felipe Dana/AP

Zika Virus Can Cause Brain Defects In Babies, CDC Confirms

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