Putting experimental drugs to the test can be a way of life. Glow Wellness/Glow RM/Getty Images hide caption

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Professional 'Guinea Pigs' Can Make A Living Testing Drugs

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Stephane Schubhan, one of six men hospitalized after the clinical trial, still suffers from neurological damage. Jean-Francois Monier/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Clinical Trials Still Don't Reflect The Diversity Of America

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Glenn Lightner in 2012 at age 13. His father searched clinicaltrials.gov for years, to no avail, hoping to find a promising experimental cancer treatment that might save his son's life. Courtesy of Lawrence Lightner hide caption

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Results Of Many Clinical Trials Not Being Reported

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Nurses assist a new patient at an Ebola center in Liberia's Lofa County. As drug trials get underway, patients may receive experimental medicines. Tommy Trenchard/NPR hide caption

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Medical Experts Look For New Ways To Test Ebola Drugs

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